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Tuesday, July 7
 

8:30am

Playful Learning Summit Keynote (and Breakfast!)
GLS is thrilled to feature a “polyvocal” keynote at this year’s Playful Learning Summit.  We’re honored to have Sujata Bhatt, Kip Glazer, and Seann Dikkers join us! Kip Glazer is an award winning teacher with a track record in coaching academic teams. She connected her high school seniors with sixth graders in three Chicago middle schools with the help of the Digital Youth Network. Sujata Bhatt is a founder of innovatED.LA as well as the designer and founder of the Incubator School whose mission is to produce the entrepreneurial teams of tomorrow. She specializes in finding opportunities that connect siloed communities within schools, and across the schools and the public and private sectors. Seann Dikkers is the founder and director of Gaming Matter, investigating new media integration strategies for educational leadership, teaching, and learning. Don’t miss this unique opportunity from these three education innovators about why playful learning matters.

Speakers
avatar for Sujata  Bhatt

Sujata Bhatt

Founder, Incubator School
avatar for Seann Dikkers

Seann Dikkers

Education Department Chair, Bethel University
Seann Dikkers is an associate professor of Education at Bethel University. Formerly, Seann served fourteen years as a middle school teacher, high school principal, and researcher. Now he teaches, writes, and works with some amazing colleagues at Bethel. He studies exemplary teaching, learning design, and learning systems. His books include *Real-Time Research*, *Mobile Media Learning I and II*, and *TeacherCraft: Minecraft in the Classroom... Read More →
avatar for Kip Glazer

Kip Glazer

Teacher / Doctoral Student, Independence High School / Pepperdine University
I am a high school teacher and doctoral student at Pepperdine Univeristy, pursuing a doctorate in Learning Technologies. I am passionate about public education, technology integration, and game-based learning. I want to help high school teachers to use more technology and games of all types in their classrooms. I advise my school's League of Legends club and Computer Coding club. I can't wait to attend the conference and learn from so many... Read More →


Tuesday July 7, 2015 8:30am - 9:45am
Great Hall

9:00am

ARIS Global Summit
Special note concerning participation in the ARIS Global Summit: Participants much pre-register for the ARIS Global Summit during the GLS/PLS registration process.  This is a day-long workshop, and inquires about participation should be directed to David Gagnon at david.gagnon@wisc.edu.

Historically, ARIS Summits have been an incredible time of connecting with other educators, researchers and designers as well as the team that makes ARIS tick.  During the action-packed day you will hear about where ARIS is going, hear stories from other ARIS educators and partake in workshops to power up what you are able to do yourself.

 

Speakers
avatar for David Gagnon

David Gagnon

Director, Field Day Lab, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I have a sweet spot for directing small design teams to approach big challenges. I like thinking and making real world products that are inspired by all the cool stuff kids like these days. I love seeing other people find themselves by making something new. I also am a bit of a baking addict, still trying to nail the traditional sour dough baguette in a wood fired oven.


Tuesday July 7, 2015 9:00am - 4:30pm
Main Lounge

10:00am

AM1: Collectible Card Games for Educators

Collectible card games and its sub-genres are popular among both children and adults.
Their educational aspects have attracted attention from education community. These 
games are not only engaging and social, but also encourage players to strategize, 
communicate and make estimates. Some players spend endless hours designing, testing, 
and refining decks. Others are constantly trying to complete and perfect their collections. 
Yet others enjoy the camaraderie of the community, as well as mentor and mentee 
relations. Some of these activities are useful in themselves, exercising logic and critical 
reasoning. Others seem ripe for adaptation to an informal learning environment. In spite 
of this, very few educational CCGs have been made. We imagine this workshop will 
spark audience members’ interest to pursue design and development of such games.
We will first present some background on the topic of collectible card games (CCGs) and 
its sub-genres. We will familiarize the audience with the educations aspects of these 
games, and common pitfalls to avoid. For the majority of the remaining time, we will 
collaborate and guide audience to make an educational CCG. During this process we will 
give examples of successful CCGs, and discuss their design characteristics. We will 
move on to a brainstorming session, followed by a division into smaller groups for design 
work. Groups will then come back together to test the games. Time allowing, the division 
and collective testing cycle will be run at least twice. We will conclude with parting 
thoughts for how the game can transition to the digital realm: what mechanics and 
dynamics would need modification without a tangible element, and possible mechanics 
that could benefit from a lack of tangibility.



Tuesday July 7, 2015 10:00am - 12:00pm
Inn Wisconsin

10:00am

AM2: Exploring Complex Issues with Transmedia Games

In this workshop we will explore how to use free digital games such as Fort McMoney and Inside the Haiti Earthquake to engage students in the social, political, economic and environmental issues related to complex topics such as oil development projects, disaster relief, and climate change.  For example, the game Fort McMoney weaves in documentary footage as players take on the role of a reporter writing a story on the boomtown Fort McMurray and the adjacent oil sands development project in Alberta, Canada (www.fortmcmoney.com).  Workshop participants will experience the games firsthand through guided gameplay and will contribute to a discussion about how to use the games effectively in the classroom in a variety of subject areas and grade levels (free student activities will also be provided).  Please bring your own device and headphones - the games are compatible with Windows, Mac and Chromebook devices (Fort McMoney can also be played as an App on iOS).  For more information please go to www.changegamer.ca.Bio:

Mike Farley has been teaching middle and high school Geography and Social Studies for 14 years in the Toronto District School Board and currently at University of Toronto Schools. He has been using digital games with his classes for over 10 years, and in 2013 founded ChangeGamer, an organization comprised of teachers and academics who are passionate about game-based learning (www.changegamer.ca).   In 2014, the Royal Canadian Geographical Society (RCGS) presented Mike with the 'Innovation in Geography Teaching' award, the highest honor for Geography teaching in Canada.  


Speakers
avatar for Mike Farley

Mike Farley

Teacher (Geography), Univerity of Toronto Schools
I have been teaching middle and high school Geography and Social Studies for 14 years in the Toronto District School Board and currently at University of Toronto Schools. I have been using digital games with my students for over 10 years and founded ChangeGamer.ca to bring together teachers and academics who are excited about the use of games in education, and in sharing their experience and resources.


Tuesday July 7, 2015 10:00am - 12:00pm
Inn Wisconsin

10:00am

AM3: Examining the Potential of Formative Assessments in Game-Based Learning

Research shows that digital games are an ideal vehicle to engage students and help 
teachers assess more frequently and more effectively. Embedded assessments 
immersed in games gives teachers actionable data and promote feedback. 
Additionally, students are motivated by game reports that provide greater 
understanding of challenges and successes. 

But for learning games to live up to this promise, a few key questions must be asked. 
What are the design features that educational game developers think about when 
integrating assessments? What is valuable information for both the student and the 
teacher? How do you prove mastery? These questions, along with a new study from 
the A-GAMES Project, will be discussed with Classroom, Inc. and BrainPOP—two 
organizations designing, developing, and distributing learning games. Participants 
will examine Classroom, Inc.’s literacy-based digital learning games and BrainPOP’s 
game-based assessment tools including SnapThought and Sortify. 

Both of these organizations were involved in the research study from the A-GAMES 
Project, which includes useful findings for game developers, researchers studying 
the impact of learning games, and educators who can learn about integrating games 
into the classroom. Leveraging the expertise of these two organizations, along with 
the new research, this hands-on workshop will focus on building a student-centered 
approach to learning through effective use of formative assessments found in 
learning games. 

Overview of Workshop Procedure & Format

Classroom, Inc. and BrainPOP will first present on how games are designed the 
teacher in mind—from alignment with rigorous standards to reinforcing 
lessons—as well as with the student in mind by seamlessly weaving assessments 
into game experiences and providing feedback. 

As a group, attendees will play the digital games, examine data from a sample class 
in an online teacher dashboard, and formulate next instructional steps. During the 
session, we will brainstorm the conversations that this data can spur between 
teacher and student. Participants will discuss how daily classroom demands can be 
addressed using game-based learning, as well as potential barriers that might exist 
and how to overcome those barriers. Using the case studies from the A-GAMES 
Project, BrainPOP and Classroom, Inc. will facilitate the discussion noting the major 
findings and engaging participants on their own feedback after exploring the games.


Speakers
JM

Jessica Millstone

Director of Engagement, BrainPOP


Tuesday July 7, 2015 10:00am - 12:00pm
Beefeaters

10:00am

AM4: Creating a “Time for Telling”: Stories, Games, & Pedagogy

In this workshop, our team of professional game designers and researchers will help in-service educators review and reflect on the role of storytelling in both education generally and game-based instruction specifically. We will begin with a workshop-wide, reflective exercise during which participants will share the personal stories they most value from their time spent in and out of the classroom (10-15 minutes). This will segue into a discussion about the way stories have been told and used historically as well as what they represent with respect to creating a “time for telling” (10-15 minutes).

The facilitators will then have participants split into three rotating subgroups given the opportunity to play three different educational games: a card debate and language learning game, a text-based roleplaying game, and an educational gaming experience grounded in a virtual world. Participants will have approximately 15-20 minutes to explore each game with facilitation provided by one of the three workshop leaders. Once the full rotation is complete (approx. 45-60 minutes), the larger group will rejoin to discuss the storytelling opportunities afforded by each game experience and how—even without modifying their instruction—teachers might think differently about the type and quality of stories emergent in their individual classrooms (15-20 minutes). The final 10-15 minutes will be dedicated to answering questions about the topics covered during the workshop, game design/instruction, and contemporary games research.

While we strongly believe that narrative, game-based lesson design is worth adopting, we recognize that the likelihood of a teacher modifying their instructional approach based on a single workshop is quite low. That is what makes this proposed experience different: rather than sidelining the pedagogical techniques teachers are already comfortable with, it repositions them in a way that allows skilled teachers to continue doing what they do best while acknowledging new, researched perspectives on how the notion of storytelling can inform best practice—an immediately actionable outcome. 


Speakers
avatar for Kevin Ballestrini

Kevin Ballestrini

Storrs, CT, US, The Pericles Group, LLC
Classics teacher at the Norwich Free Academy in Connecticut, instructional designer, and game designer. Co-founder of The Pericles Group.
avatar for Stephen Slota

Stephen Slota

Co-Founder, The Pericles Group, LLC
Steve (@steveslota) is an instructional design specialist and game design scientist at the University of Connecticut Health Center and a co-founder of The Pericles Group, LLC. He holds a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology: Cognition, Instruction, & Learning Technologies and has worked on a variety of game and instructional design projects with organizations including Arizona State University's Center for Games & Impact, Intel Corporation, and... Read More →
avatar for Roger Travis

Roger Travis

Storrs, CT, US, University of Connecticut, and The Pericles Group, LLC
Only connect: ancient epic to video games; teacher to student; gamer to gamer; fan to fan; parent to child; human being to human being.


Tuesday July 7, 2015 10:00am - 12:00pm
Capitol View

10:00am

AM5: Panel on Local Playful Learning Innovation

This panel presentation will consist of a collection of Wisconsin educational innovators using games and digital media to engage students and enhance learning.  Hear their stories, learn from their dynamic examples and participate in lively discussion!


Speakers
avatar for Marshall Behringer

Marshall Behringer

Madison, WI, USA, Filament Games
Marshall is the Community Development & Outreach Specialist at Filament Games. A former educator, he grows and engages with the community of educators and classrooms that Filament works with on a regular basis. He directs user testing and advocates for teacher and learner needs as Filament designs and develops their learning games.


Tuesday July 7, 2015 10:00am - 12:00pm
Langdon

10:00am

AM6: Adapting Games as Teaching Solutions to Persistent Problems
Recent research on the use of games in classrooms is encouraging suggesting that teachers increasingly use games for motivation, engagement and to reinforce or teach content. However, educators still report numerous barriers and uncertainty in finding or matching games to deep learning. Most educational institutions continue to struggle with logistical and infrastructure considerations, curriculum requirements, lack of practitioner understanding, and at times, prohibitive policies. Bridging research to practice with any innovative technology is difficult.

Furthermore, teachers - as a whole, are not gamers, and struggle to integrate video games as learning tools. Resistance to games in school often involves: (1) game researchers or developers claiming a mismatch between game mechanics and curriculum goals in formal schooling (Chmiel, 2012); (2) educators maintaining games are distracting, sedentary or logistically difficult to integrate into an already prescribed curriculum (Klopfer, Osteweil, & Salen, 2009); and (3) technical issues making access and implementation cumbersome (Sandford, Ulicsak, Facer, & Rudd, 2006; Fishman et al., 2014).  How do we begin to address these problems making it easier to bring games to the classroom?  One solution may be to ask educators, game designers, and researchers to work together.

This session is designed to draw on our collective expertise by providing examples of “well-designed” educational games, engaging participants in game play, and then discussing whether the games live up to their promise. Minecraft.edu, Quandary and iCivics, games promoted for use in school with different learning objectives, will be used to examine the research-to-practice gap and facilitate our discussions. After a brief preview, participants will self-select a game to play and lend their expertise to the group discussion.

Are these games a mismatch or aligned with curriculum goals? Can they be effectively integrated in classrooms? Are there adequate supporting resources or community of practices around the game? Will technical or logistical issues prohibit students from deep learning? What would make them better? You be the judge!

Be prepared for an interactive session with lively discussion!

Student Facilitators for this session are Conor O'Malley and Kayleigh Bitters both pre-service education students from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. 

Speakers
avatar for Seann Dikkers

Seann Dikkers

Education Department Chair, Bethel University
Seann Dikkers is an associate professor of Education at Bethel University. Formerly, Seann served fourteen years as a middle school teacher, high school principal, and researcher. Now he teaches, writes, and works with some amazing colleagues at Bethel. He studies exemplary teaching, learning design, and learning systems. His books include *Real-Time Research*, *Mobile Media Learning I and II*, and *TeacherCraft: Minecraft in the Classroom... Read More →
avatar for Danielle Herro

Danielle Herro

Assistant Professor, DML, Clemson University
I study game-based curricula and learning in K-12 classrooms, teach courses on the potential of games, social media and emerging technologies to promote learning, and most recently have begun large-scale initiatives to move STEAM practices into schools.
avatar for Remi Holden

Remi Holden

GLS Playful Learning Summit Co-Chair, University of Colorado Denver
avatar for Beth King

Beth King

Assistant Professor, Educational Foundations, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater


Tuesday July 7, 2015 10:00am - 12:00pm
Class of '24

12:15pm

Playful Learning Lunch and Expo
Lunch will accompany an Expo featuring various digital media and learning organizations. Participating organizations include:

BrainPOP
Classroom Inc.
Common Sense Media
Filament Games
IlliniCloud
Incubator School
Innovative Schools Network
Institute of Play
Moveable Game Jam
Twin Cities Public Television 

Tuesday July 7, 2015 12:15pm - 1:45pm
Tripp Commons

2:00pm

PM6: Identifying New Problems and Game Design Opportunities
This session concerns a core question: What are persistent problems of practice - in teaching, or in design, or in community engagement, or in advocacy - that games (and game-based learning) are not addressing well?  We will explore this question through both small group discussions, shared reflections, and design challenges.  This session's supporting and collaborative Google Doc can be found here.

The session's general agenda:
2 - 2:30 Introductions and Small Group Discussion
2:30 - 2:50 Large Group Sharing and Reflection
2:50 - 3:45 Group Design Challenges
3:45 - 4:00 Share Design Challenges

Speakers
avatar for Remi Holden

Remi Holden

GLS Playful Learning Summit Co-Chair, University of Colorado Denver
avatar for Beth King

Beth King

Assistant Professor, Educational Foundations, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater


Tuesday July 7, 2015 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Council Room

2:00pm

PM1: Movable Game Jams: A Model for Informal Youth Education

A Movable Game Jam is a model for helping youth develop higher order thinking and creation skills through the process of game design. The model was collaboratively developed by 12 organization in the NYC Hive Learning Network. The model is specifically designed as a one-off, 3.5 hour after-school activity. The model is also scaffolded by a live document of best practices (bit.ly/GameJamGuide) and a community of educators dedicated to contributing their knowledge to that document. We have currently run 7 Movable Game Jams, reaching over 200 youth and sharing 22 unique activities in the Game Jam Guide. We are actively trying to spread the model to more cities and expand the community of Movable Game Jam educators.

A Movable Game Jam event has three parts: an introductory activity to the principles of game design, an open design period, and a shareout. The majority of the event is spent in the open design period in which four stations are set up, each featuring an organization running a game design activity. Each station involves creating or hacking some aspect of a game, and can be completed in an hour. Every aspect of the event is “movable”- each time the event is run, it is at a different host organization, with different stations run by different organizations featuring different activities and/or game authoring tools.

This workshop has two goals: familiarize participants with the Movable Game Jam model, and empower and inspire them to run Movable Game Jams in their own cities. To accomplish this, our workshop lets participants experience a mini game jam. Participants will be briefly introduced to the presenters and the Movable Game Jam model (15 min). Participants will then experience a mini game jam, first by doing an introductory activity to the principles of game design (45 min), and then by engaging in three sample stations that feature game design activities from the Game Jam Guide (40 minutes). The last 20 minutes will be a debrief, introducing the Game Jam Guide and the professional development benefits to educators in running this model, and opening the floor for questions.

The Movable Game Jam is intended to be a highly collaborative model, and thus this workshop will offer something for almost anyone interested in game design as an educational tool. Schools or community organizations can act as host for these events, and educators, graduate students, faculty, and/or game designers can act as facilitators for particular stations. The event works best when collaboratively run by facilitators with very different backgrounds, so that the facilitators learn as much from working with each other as students learn from the facilitators. Depending on their level of expertise in game design education, the facilitators can use existing activities from the Game Jam Guide or develop their own activities from their favorite game design tools.


Speakers
avatar for Kevin Miklasz

Kevin Miklasz

Assessment Specialist, BrainPOP
I work on the design of new playful assessments on BrainPOP's website, and the analysis of the clickstream data that results from such assessments. I describe myself as a gamer, foodie, scientists and educator in no particular order. I love teaching kids using games and game design, I like creating games myself and I like analyzing them.
avatar for Brendon Trombley

Brendon Trombley

Game Designer, Institute of Play
Brendon Trombley is a game designer, educator, and adventurer living in New York City. His passions involve games, technology, learning, travel, and food, and he tries to mix and match them whenever possible (be careful when combining food and technology!). | | Brendon is a graduate of the New Media Design program at Rochester Institute of Technology, where he trained in the principles of design in addition to a wide array of... Read More →


Tuesday July 7, 2015 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Inn Wisconsin

2:00pm

PM2: The Phylo Project: an Online Resource for DIY Biodiversity Trading Card Generation

Phylo (http://phylogame.org) is a project that began as a reaction to the following nugget of information: Kids know more about Pokemon creatures than they do about real creatures. Phylo is also: (1) a card game that makes use of the wonderful, complex, and inspiring things that inform the notion of biodiversity; (2) an exercise in crowd sourcing, open access, and open game development; and (3) a tool that enables easy generation of classroom biodiversity decks. 

This hands-on workshop will introduce participants to this online resource, and will also provide teacher access accounts so that they can learn how to use this tool in their own classrooms. This includes a guided step by step tour on the nuances and logistics of creating classroom DIY decks that will be playable and expandable with the rest of the Phylo system. By the end of the workshop, we hope that the collective efforts of the group will have created a beta deck!

0:00 - 0:10: Introduction to the project
0:10 - 0:20: Discussion on what type of deck to create.
0:20 - 0:40: Independent web based research to find information on participants chosen organism (this will be facilitated with a one page worksheet).
0:40 - 1:00: Tour of the DIY card creation section of the Phylo website.
1:00 - 1:10: BREAK
1:10 - 1:30 Participants create their own card based on the information they found.
1:30 - 1:40: Showing off the deck and closing words.
1:40 - 1:50: Time for questions

Higher Education Participants are welcome.

Participants should come with a laptop or tablet device with online access.

Participants will receive account access to the Phylo project website so that they can continue using it in their own settings/classrooms.


Speakers
avatar for David Ng

David Ng

Faculty, University of British Columbia
David Ng is a geneticist, science educator, and faculty based at the UBC Michael Smith Laboratories.  Of note: (1) he is partly responsible for the massive DNA helix emblazoned on his building’s facade; (2) his Dad beat up Bruce Lee; (3) his first foray into general publishing featured a unicorn on the front cover; and (4) his lab studies things like Pokemon and creativity. Learn more at bioteach.ubc.ca


Tuesday July 7, 2015 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Inn Wisconsin

2:00pm

PM3: Using At-Home Games for In-School Benefits

How can you leverage the excitement, joy, and learning fostered in the commercial games kids play in their free time? How can at-home games be used in school? Join this workshop to explore how we can connect kids’ love of commercial games traditionally not considered “educational.”

Participants explore three games for kids covering topics ranging from grades 6-12: Journey, FTL: Faster than Light, and Little Big Planet 2. Through deep dive case studies and hands-on exploration, participants identify ways they can utilize commercial games with students, blurring the line of home/school, commercial/educational, and leisure/learning.

A 2014 national study on teaching with digital games (Takeuchi & Vaala) reveals that, of 694 K-8 teachers surveyed, 26% don’t use digital games with students, and just 8% of “game-using teachers” say their students play commercial games adapted for educational use. When they do, only 25% of the time are they used to teach students, and 20% to practice material already learned. The authors ask the question, “Why aren’t K-8 teachers using games created for general audiences?”

This workshop will address these issues related to commercial games and learning, exploring with teachers how they can integrate popular games into their curriculum. Starting with a straightforward goal to reach the distant mountain peak, Journey explores complex concepts like life, death, and partnership, weaving them into a metaphor which can translate to ELA, character education, and social studies units. FTL: Faster Than Light is a strategic role-playing game where players control a ship and crew. A challenging game, with fiery wrecks more likely than successes, it builds problem solving skills around failure, re-evaluation, decision-making, and interdependence of systems, many skills valuable in STEM learning. Little Big Planet 2 combines creativity, physics and Rube Goldberg-esque components, and a creative community, making it great for maker environments and STEAM.

Participants will: Explain the benefits and challenges of using commercial games in educational settings. Identify ways to integrate popular games, including Journey, FTL: Faster Than Light, and Little Big Planet 2, or other commercial games, into specific lessons or curriculum units, helping to achieve learning objectives around STEAM, ELA, and social studies. Create a Lesson Flow, a tech-rich lesson plan that integrates games to support learning objectives.


Speakers

Tuesday July 7, 2015 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Beefeaters

2:00pm

PM4: From a Blank Piece of Paper to a Game: Using Design Thinking to Question Data and Reverse Engineer Gaming Environments.
Scientists, engineers, social scientists, and humanists around the world use advanced digital resources and services everyday. Things like supercomputers, data collection, and innovative technologies are critical to the success of those researchers, who use them to make our lives healthier, safer, and better. In this workshop participants will explore the relationship between information and experience. Through the use of questioning we will document the ways that we understand material, make information concrete. From this perspective we will propose possible gaming environments to facilitate understanding. Participants will bring the data from which we will participate in a collaborative brainstorming experience. In the workshop participants will analyze, define, ideate and prototype possible experiences.

Speakers
avatar for Cary Staples

Cary Staples

Professor : School of Art, University of Tennessee
my students call me the "designosaur". I am one of "those" who studied in Brissago. | I am a creative problem solver, designer, origami explorer, I love visualizing math. I have to learn to code in "processing" for my next idea, damn it. | My students helped me to design a game for my "Idea of Design" class to replace test, yeah. | I currently have a group of "rogue" students working on a game to teach french to undergraduate students... Read More →


Tuesday July 7, 2015 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Class of '24

2:00pm

PM5: Breathe for Change and Playful Learning - CANCELLED
THIS SESSION HAS BEEN CANCELLED.

Tuesday July 7, 2015 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Langdon

4:30pm

PLS Happy Hour
Please enjoy food and drink with your fellow Playful Learning Summit participants.  The GLS Arcade will be open, and everyone is welcome to play games and socialize.

Tuesday July 7, 2015 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Tripp Commons

6:00pm

Game Night!
Android: Netrunner is a card game that has taken the game design world by storm. At this year’s GLS, Indiana University’s Playful Culture Lab will host a Networking with Netrunner meetup in the Memorial Union Rathskeller on the Tuesday evening before the conference. If you’re interested in learning how to play Netrunner, we’re happy to teach you! If you already know how and want to have some fun playing with other GLS attendees, bring your decks. If you’d rather play some other game, like Magic: The Gathering, The Metagame, One Night Ultimate Werewolf, Family Business, definitely come and play with us! And, of course,if you’d just like to stop by, socialize, and meet other GLS attendees, then by all means, do. We’ll have news about participation prizes and other fun stuff in the coming months; stay tuned for more info!

Sponsors
avatar for Sean Duncan

Sean Duncan

Assistant Professor, Indiana University


Tuesday July 7, 2015 6:00pm - 10:00pm
Rathskeller

6:30pm

Higher Education Game Alliance Social
Higher Education Game Alliance Social
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm on the Tripp Deck

The Higher Education Video Game Alliance invites you to join us at a celebration of games in higher education at the Games+Learning+Society Conference in Madison WI on Tuesday, July 7. Traditional Wisconsin fare will be served. Join us for food, drink, great company, and a beautiful view of the Tripp Deck overlooking Lake Monona.

Tuesday July 7, 2015 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Tripp Deck
 
Wednesday, July 8
 

9:00am

Breakfast and Keynote
An Ecological View of Equity: Strategies For Expanding Youth Access to Connected Learning Opportunities
Nichole Pinkard

While much attention has focused on creating more accessible and equitable connected learning opportunities for youth, much work still remains towards achieving intended equity.  In her talk, Nichole Pinkard will examine the Digital Youth Network's journey towards achieving these goals with a focus on how DYN's lessons learned from implementing YOUMedia and Chicago City of Learning are impacting the design of the Digital Divas middle school STEM learning initiative.

Speakers
avatar for Nichole Pinkard

Nichole Pinkard

Nichole Pinkard is an Associate Professor and Chair of the School of Design in the College of Computing and Digital Media at DePaul University in Chicago. She is the founder of Digital Youth Network, co-founder of Inquirium LLC and Remix Learning LLC, home of iRemix, a social learning platform that connects youth’s learning opportunities in school, home, and beyond. | | In collaboration with the Chicago Public Library, Dr. Pinkard helped... Read More →


Wednesday July 8, 2015 9:00am - 10:00am
Great Hall

10:30am

Higher Education Video Game Alliance
Higher Education Video Game Alliance
Diana Lawson, Constance Steinkuehler



Wednesday July 8, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Capitol View

10:30am

(Academic) Game [Design|Research] Labs: What Are They and How Do You (Not) Start One?
(Academic) Game [Design|Research] Labs: What Are They and How Do You (Not) Start One?
Casey O'Donnell, Kurt Squire, Liz Lawley, Mark Chen, Mia Consalvo, Roger Altizer, Sean Duncan, Tracy Fullerton

Academic game labs take on a variety of forms at the universities that house them. Their funding structures, resources, and positions can come in varied nuanced configurations. This panel brings together a bevy of directors from academic game labs to share stories about starting, managing, shaping and even leaving labs. They have all attempted to define (and differentiate) the goals or missions of their labs, their relationship to the larger academy, and where they stand with regards to game studies/research as a field/discipline. Panelists will discuss their struggles and triumphs, how they and their labs have changed over the years, and anything else that can be packed into an hour long discussion. The panelists will synthesize their experiences, field questions, and offer insights to those working with labs, hoping to start one, or seeking to better understand the various possible functions of a game lab.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Chen

Mark Chen

Accidental Hero and Layabout, Independent
non-tenure track positions. | life after a PhD. | gaming culture and power/agency in gaming practice. | esoteric gaming practices, workarounds, and hacks. | subversion, representation, margins. | board games.
avatar for Mia Consalvo

Mia Consalvo

I research game studies and design at Concordia University in Montreal. Currently I'm finishing a book about Japan and it's role in the videogame industry and videogame culture. I'm also studying social games, and have been developing a game called Eksa: Isle of the Wisekind on Facebook that is experimenting with different ways to promote social interaction among players.
avatar for Tracy Fullerton

Tracy Fullerton

Director, USC Games
Tracy Fullerton is an award-winning experimental game designer, professor, and director of the cross-disciplinary USC Games program, a collaboration between the USC School of Cinematic Arts and the Viterbi School of Engineering. She holds the Electronic Arts Endowed Chair in Interactive Entertainment and her many game credits include Cloud, flOw, Darfur is Dying, The Night Journey (a collaboration with media artist Bill Viola), and most recently... Read More →
avatar for Liz Lawley

Liz Lawley

Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology


Wednesday July 8, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Main Lounge

10:30am

Game Making & Modding
Video Game Making & Modding in the Wild:  A Review of Recent Research
Elisabeth Gee, Kelly Tran

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of current literature on video game making and modding (modification) in fan communities and other informal settings. The paper also identifies new game making tools and communities that have the potential to broaden participation and expand the nature of game making practices. A final section addresses key issues and directions for future research.


Applying “Deep Gamification” Principles to Improve Quality of User-Designed Levels
Andrew Hicks, Yihuan Dong, Rui Zhi, Tiffany Barnes

While there are many potential benefits of user-generated content for serious games, the variability of that content's quality poses a serious problem. In our game, BOTS, players can create puzzles which are shared with other users. However, other players often find these puzzles irrelevant, unplayable, too difficult, or simply boring. The ‘Deep Gamification’ framework presented by Boyce et. al may help us avoid presenting players with low-quality puzzles that result in frustration, off-task behavior, and ultimately disengagement. To investigate this we have designed two new level editors for BOTS, following the Deep Gamification framework. In this paper, we discuss how the design choices made for those editors were informed by the Deep Gamification framework.


Meet the (Media) Producers
Danielle Herro, Lorraine Lin

This research details the perceived influence of early gaming habits towards media production from seven students enrolled at a university in the Southeast. Participants identified as heavily involved in creating media such as anime, videos, fanfiction, webcomics, games, and digital music. Data collection and analysis included surveys, interviews, and artifacts identifying and categorizing six main themes: game play preferences, persistence, early connections between game play and media, support and feedback, creations inspired by games, and significance of games in current lives. The study found that most participants believed game play in childhood influenced increasingly complex media production habits. Six of the seven believed game play influenced their career path. The paper concludes with implications for education.

Moderators
avatar for Caroline Hardin

Caroline Hardin

Conference Co-Chair, Games+Learning+Society
PhD student of Computer Science Education

Speakers
avatar for Elisabeth Gee

Elisabeth Gee

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
I'm the Associate Director of the Center for Games & Impact at ASU, and co-directing the Play2Connect initiative with Dr. Sinem Siyahhan at Cal State-San Marcos. I'm interested in gender and gaming, game-based affinity spaces, and intergenerational play.
avatar for Danielle Herro

Danielle Herro

Assistant Professor, DML, Clemson University
I study game-based curricula and learning in K-12 classrooms, teach courses on the potential of games, social media and emerging technologies to promote learning, and most recently have begun large-scale initiatives to move STEAM practices into schools.
KM

Kelly M. Tran

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University


Wednesday July 8, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Inn Wisconsin

10:30am

Games for Engineering & Code
 VerilogTown: Cars, Crashes and Hardware Design
Peter Jamieson, Lindsay Grace, Naoki Mizuno, Boyu Zhang, Josh Collins, Alex Williams, John-Rhys Garcia

VerilogTown is a game about cars, crashes and hardware design. The game allows players to learn, practice and play with the Verilog Hardware Description Language (HDL). The game asks players solve a variety of traffic puzzles using digital logic designs specified through an HDL design, which is what hardware designers use to create applications synthesizable to integrated chips. This paper outlines the design and final product, including the fundamental benefits of such approach. It is provided as a case study in domain specific game design that should prove useful to other researchers looking to employ the potential of play to facilitate learning of complex systems, models and theories.


We Teach Programming with Video Games
Nathan Aschenbach, David Arditti

Our curriculum leverages your student's passion for video games, like Minecraft, to make learning STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) skills relevant. We believe games inspire discovery, foster innovation, and reward playfulness.


Engineering Tony Hawk: Examining Skatepark Customization Mechanics for ChildrenÍs Design Learning
Benjamin DeVane, Kristen Missall, Deb Dunkhase

This paper examines and analyzes Tony Hawk’s Proving Ground (THPG) to winnow and sift mechanics for player configuration of skateparks. As part of the preliminary stages of designing a collaborative design-and-play skatepark game that helps young children and families make connections between the physics and the design activity of engineering we examine the game mechanics of Tony Hawk’s Proving Ground relative to their potential for supporting the teaching skatepark physics systems design, a critical component of pre- engineering education. We argue that the games’ support for creative spatial design, structured problem-solving and making real-world connections offer generative possibilities for a design-based physics and engineering game.

Moderators
MB

Matthew Berland

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison

Speakers
avatar for Benjamin DeVane

Benjamin DeVane

Iowa City, Iowa, United States, University of Iowa
Identity & Learning | Computational Thinking | Design & Aesthetics
avatar for Lindsay Grace

Lindsay Grace

Director and Associate Professor, American University Game Lab
Lindsay Grace is a professor, game designer, programmer, and artist. Lindsay is an associate professor at American University and founding director of the American University Game Lab and Studio. His game designs have received numerous awards and he has published more than 50 papers, articles, and book chapters on games. His creative work has been showcased in more than eight countries and 12 U.S. states, including New York, Paris, Rio De... Read More →


Wednesday July 8, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Old Madison

10:30am

Teacher Pioneers: Adventures with Media, Pedagogy, and Play in K-16 Learning
Teacher Pioneers: Adventures with Media, Pedagogy, and Play in K-16 Learning
Caro Williams-Pierce, Alainya Kavaloski, Deborah Fields, David Ng, Kip Glazer, Lucas Cook, Sean Duncan, Seann Dikkers, Steve Isaacs, Trent Hergenrader, Jeremiah Holden

This symposium brings together a myriad of K-16 teachers and authors who have designed, built, and implemented digital media or game-based learning in their classrooms. Speaker experiences range from elementary school to teacher professional development, from science to wilderness teaching, from behavioral management to e-textiles, and many things in between! This session will focus on supporting small group sessions with these pioneers, and discussions of the practical aspects of using such technologies in the messy, surprising, and delightful context of classrooms, schools, and other learning environments.

Speakers
avatar for Seann Dikkers

Seann Dikkers

Education Department Chair, Bethel University
Seann Dikkers is an associate professor of Education at Bethel University. Formerly, Seann served fourteen years as a middle school teacher, high school principal, and researcher. Now he teaches, writes, and works with some amazing colleagues at Bethel. He studies exemplary teaching, learning design, and learning systems. His books include *Real-Time Research*, *Mobile Media Learning I and II*, and *TeacherCraft: Minecraft in the Classroom... Read More →
avatar for Sean Duncan

Sean Duncan

Assistant Professor, Indiana University
avatar for Deborah Fields

Deborah Fields

Independent Research Consultant & Temporary Assistant Professor of Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences, Utah State University
Dr. Deborah A. Fields is a Temporary Assistant Professor in Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University and an independent research consultant. Deborah researches children’s connective learning and identity engagement through designing with digital technologies in ways that bridge informal and formal learning contexts. She is the co-PI on the Kids' DIY Media Project (kidsdiymedia.com) aimed at identifying and... Read More →
avatar for Kip Glazer

Kip Glazer

Teacher / Doctoral Student, Independence High School / Pepperdine University
I am a high school teacher and doctoral student at Pepperdine Univeristy, pursuing a doctorate in Learning Technologies. I am passionate about public education, technology integration, and game-based learning. I want to help high school teachers to use more technology and games of all types in their classrooms. I advise my school's League of Legends club and Computer Coding club. I can't wait to attend the conference and learn from so many... Read More →
avatar for Remi Holden

Remi Holden

GLS Playful Learning Summit Co-Chair, University of Colorado Denver
avatar for Alainya Kavaloski

Alainya Kavaloski

PhD Candidate, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Laini Kavaloski is a dissertator in the English department at University of Wisconsin-Madison and is heading off to teach media design and literature at SUNY-Canton in the fall. She has an M.A in literature from Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She is passionate about literature, narrative and persuasive games, digital design, and hybrid pedagogy.
avatar for David Ng

David Ng

Faculty, University of British Columbia
David Ng is a geneticist, science educator, and faculty based at the UBC Michael Smith Laboratories.  Of note: (1) he is partly responsible for the massive DNA helix emblazoned on his building’s facade; (2) his Dad beat up Bruce Lee; (3) his first foray into general publishing featured a unicorn on the front cover; and (4) his lab studies things like Pokemon and creativity. Learn more at bioteach.ubc.ca
avatar for Caro Williams-Pierce

Caro Williams-Pierce

University of Wisconsin-Madison
Caro's a PhD candidate in Mathematics Education at UW-Madison, and heading off in the fall to the University at Albany, SUNY, to build more math education games. Her dissertation involved building a fractions game in LittleBigPlanet 2, and evaluating shifts in understanding reversible multiplicative relationships as a result of playing the game. These days, her hair is less marigold and more aquamarine/lavender (it's Conor's fault).


Wednesday July 8, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Class of '24

10:30am

Prepare to Suffer: Let’s Play as Well Played
Prepare to Suffer: Let’s Play as Well Played
Moses Wolfenstein, Paul Berberich

This paper explores the premise that a written document alone cannot fully capture and convey what it means for a game to be well-played. It postulates that the Let’s Play (LP) narrated video format is an optimal modality for documenting a well-played video game. The authors explore this idea through their own playthrough and LP of Dark Souls by From Software. In addition, they examine how the LP can serve as a record of learning.

Speakers
avatar for Moses Wolfenstein

Moses Wolfenstein

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin, Extension
Moses has worked in the field of education for over a decade, and has been studying and creating games and other digital media for learning since 2006. He holds a PhD from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis where he worked with his adviser Rich Halverson on games for school leadership. As SeniorInteraction Developer at University of Wisconsin-Extension, Moses works to improve user experiences and... Read More →


Wednesday July 8, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Play Circle Theater

10:30am

The Future of Playful Learning
The Future of Playful Learning: Designing a National Community of Educators, Game Designers & Researchers
Jennifer Groff, Peter Stidwill, Beth King

Playful Learning is a national initiative to support educators in game-based learning practices. Since the launch of the initiative at GLS 9.0 Conference in June 2013, we have reached more than 2,500 educators at more than 40 events across the US. Now at the conclusion of our initial 2-year launch and pilot of the program, we invite the larger GLS community to help co-design the future of the initiative and better support not just educators but designers, developers and researchers in a central hub and community around game-based learning.

Speakers
avatar for Beth King

Beth King

Assistant Professor, Educational Foundations, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
avatar for Peter Stidwill

Peter Stidwill

Executive Producer, Learning Games Network
I create educational games and digital learning products. I'm Executive Producer at the Learning Games Network, a non-profit spin-off of the MIT Education Arcade and the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Games+Learning+Society program. I produced the award-winning ethical-thinking game ‘Quandary’, and am now working on ‘Playful Learning’, an initiative to catalyze the use of game based learning in schools. I previously worked at the... Read More →


Wednesday July 8, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Beefeaters

11:30am

Coffee Break & Snack
Wednesday July 8, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Great Hall

12:00pm

Assessment & Stupidity
Assessment & Stupidity
James Paul Gee

Speakers

Wednesday July 8, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Capitol View

12:00pm

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Youth AR Game Creation
How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Youth AR Game Creation
Judy Perry, Bob Coulter, Juan Rubio, Chris Holden

In the constructionist tradition, the creation of augmented reality (AR) games can be an effective method of engaging youth in informal learning around both domain-specific content as well as general design thinking. However, given the complex, interdisciplinary nature of AR games, the facilitation of programming in which youth create these games can be challenging. How do students from different age groups and backgrounds best learn this novel genre and the related design process? What are the most challenging issues? How can facilitators attempt to empower youth agency and youth voice in the context of a larger organization’s educational goals and the desire for a “product” within a given timeframe? In this highly interactive session, panelists from diverse settings - including a botanical garden, an urban after-school program, and a university - will share insights from their efforts to empower youth via the creation of AR games.

Speakers
avatar for Bob Coulter

Bob Coulter

Director, Litzsinger Road Ecology Center (Missouri Botanical Garden)
I spend most of my time thinking about ways to get kids excited about learning and taking action in the community. A good part of this involves games they design with MIT's Taleblazer and StarLogo Nova tools, or in playing Equations, a really cool math game.
avatar for Chris Holden

Chris Holden

Associate Professor, University of New Mexico
Christopher Holden is an Associate Professor at the Honors College of the University of New Mexico. His PhD is in number theory, but his current research focuses on place based game design for learning. He has been doing this since 2006, originally using MIT’s Outdoor AR Engine. He was the first outside user of ARIS; in 2009 he and Julie Sykes produced and used Mentira, a murder mystery for Spanish language students at UNM. Shortly... Read More →
avatar for Judy Perry

Judy Perry

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Judy currently oversees design, development and research for several projects involving games and simulations for mobile devices, including smartphones and tablets. Her research interests include location-based games and ubiquitous “casual” games. When she is not making or playing mobile games, Judy also leads professional development workshops for educators who want to implement location-based and other games in both formal and informal... Read More →
avatar for Juan Rubio

Juan Rubio

Digital Media and Learning Program Manager, The Seattle Public Library
Juan is the program manager for Digital Media and Learning at the Seattle Public Library where he oversees the development and implementation of programs in the Library system. He works with staff at the 27 different branches that are part of the Library system to implement programs that use digital media with the connected learning framework. Juan has a master's degree in Media Studies from the New School University in New York City, and... Read More →


Wednesday July 8, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Main Lounge

12:00pm

Dealing with Game Data
Using Spatial Game Analytics to Analyze Player Paths Through Games
Dennis Ramirez, Matthew Berland

By combining pre-test and post-test measures with spatial gaming analytics, we will investigate how different player types move through a level, and how those differences can inform the design of educational games like Fair Play. Of particular interest were the differences between participants who had a high final bias compared to a low final bias, and participants who play games more than an hour a week, and those that do not. Initial analysis revealed differences in the way these groups played Fair Play.

Data Collection in The Radix Endeavor: A Working Example

Louisa Rosenheck, Susannah Gordon-Messer, Jody Clarke-Midura

The Radix Endeavor (radixendeavor.org) is an online multiplayer game designed to improve knowledge and engagement in high school math and science students. In a robust virtual world, players explain and solve problems by completing narrative driven quests to progress through the world. As they take on the roles of scientists and mathematicians in authentic situations, they develop inquiry, problem solving and critical thinking skills. Through a dashboard, the game allows teachers to monitor student progress as well as access resources that connect the gameplay to classroom instruction.


ADAGE (Assessment Data Aggregator for Game Environments)
Mike Tissenbaum, Dennis Ramirez, Mark Stenerson, Isaac Goodin, Matthew Berland

There is a growing interest in investigating how games help learners learn; however, many researchers are unable to decipher the myriad of co-occurring events happening when learners engage in digital games, or how they might provide insight into the learning taking place. In response, we introduce ADAGE (Assessment Data Aggregator for Game Environments), a set of data collection and analysis tools on a shared, open source platform that use big data techniques to transform clickstream data from game and design systems into formative feedback for usability testing and evidence of learning. ADAGE aims to formalize the data formats captured and output when learners play with games. Creating a standard will a) make it easier for researchers to collect and analyze the data; and b) allow designers and developers to create a common API for working with ADAGE data, which can allow for a wider generalizability of tools and methodologies.

Moderators
avatar for Douglas Clark

Douglas Clark

Vanderbilt University
www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jaznkUOW6E | chais 2013 talk (1 hour) | | http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlMfk5rP9yI&feature=youtu.be | cyberlearning summit 2012 talk (10 minutes) | | Doug Clark's research investigates the learning processes through which people come to understand core science concepts. This work focuses primarily on conceptual change, explanation, collaboration, and argumentation. Clark's research often explores these... Read More →

Speakers
MB

Matthew Berland

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
avatar for Susannah Gordon-Messer

Susannah Gordon-Messer

Education Content Manager, The Education Arcade, MIT
The Radix Endeavor, a multiplayer online game for high school STEM learning. radixendeavor.org
avatar for Dennis Ramirez

Dennis Ramirez

Technical Director, USC IMGD, Videogame Researcher
avatar for Louisa Rosenheck

Louisa Rosenheck

Research Manager, MIT Education Arcade
Louisa is a Research Manager in the MIT Scheller Teacher Education Program. She manages the design, content, and development of educational games and simulations to be used with middle and high school students. She also oversees the research done on these projects exploring how games can be used most effectively in both formal and informal educational settings. Most recently Louisa has held the role of lead designer on The Radix Endeavor, a... Read More →
avatar for Mark  Stenerson

Mark Stenerson

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
MT

Mike Tissenbaum

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison


Wednesday July 8, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Old Madison

12:00pm

Game-A-Palooza
Game-A-Palooza
Craig G Anderson, John Binzak, Lauren Wielgus, Jennifer Dalsen, Mark Stenerson, Sheri Ebert, Julia Robinson, David Azari, Laura Bloker, Pasqueline Scaico, Robert Bohanen, Kurt Squire, Constance Steinkuehler

Pairing games with education has been attempted many times with the hopes that the engaging nature of games will fuel student learning. However, these attempts often fall short of their goals by either losing student interest as soon as the game is forced into the classroom or because the game does not adequately promote learning of the desired material. Maintaining student interest while keeping learning goals on track has proven to be non-trivial. In an attempt to achieve these goals, we at GLS created an informal learning event called Game-A-Palooza in which students participated in 3 curricula designed around 5 educational games. Each game was created as a stand-alone learning tool and the curricula were designed to supplement the materials embedded in them. From these games and curricula, we obtained multiple data streams spanning quantitative click-stream data of each player’s game behaviors to talk audio data during each session to physical artifacts created by the players during sessions. Through this symposium, we will detail the design of each curriculum, the data streams that were collected, plans for analysis of both qualitative and quantitative data, challenges of creating the event, and future directions.  

Speakers

Wednesday July 8, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Inn Wisconsin

12:00pm

Learning Through Design: ARIS
Learning Through Design: ARIS
David Gagnon, Rachelle Vang, Breanne Litts

This project represents four case studies conducted across two distinctly different undergraduate courses where learners used media as a tool to build their own location-based mobile narrative experience. Our goal is to better understand how to facilitate a learning through design process using ARIS, an open source tool for creating mobile, locative games, narratives, and field research activities (Holden, Gagnon, Litts, & Smith, 2013). Using a Design Based Research (Brown, 1992; DBRC, 2003) methodology we altered the instructional approach across four iterations in order to explore the relationships between the design tools, design process, and content. We hope to use our findings to inform the development of future design projects.

Speakers
avatar for David Gagnon

David Gagnon

Director, Field Day Lab, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I have a sweet spot for directing small design teams to approach big challenges. I like thinking and making real world products that are inspired by all the cool stuff kids like these days. I love seeing other people find themselves by making something new. I also am a bit of a baking addict, still trying to nail the traditional sour dough baguette in a wood fired oven.


Wednesday July 8, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Class of '24

12:00pm

Rocksmith 2014 - 60 Days of Variety, Feedback, and Missions
Rocksmith 2014 - 60 Days of Variety, Feedback, and Missions
Osvaldo Jimenez

Rocksmith 2014 is a game that the developers have mentioned as specifically geared towards learning the guitar. This paper covers the experience of playing the game over 60 days for 1 hour each day, an idea promoted by the developers of the game. The paper discusses how Rocksmith 2014’s 60 Day challenge, along with its variety in play options, well-constructed feedback, and mission system make it a game worth further discussion.

Speakers
OJ

Osvaldo Jimenez

University of the Pacific


Wednesday July 8, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Play Circle Theater

12:00pm

Reflective Gaming Course
Reflective Gaming Course
Rafael Albuquerque

The Reflective Gaming Course was developed to support young people’s reflections on the potential effects of playing games, and thus support a more informed and reflective gaming practice. It includes potential positive and negative effects. The course was empirically investigated in UK secondary schools, and a summarized version of the course is offered in this workshop. Attendees will be asked to choose one of three effects of gaming to focus on this workshop: tangential learning, cognitive gains, or stereotyped representations. Participants will be invited to reflect on their own gaming practices in the light of research findings on effects of gaming, and to think about how they can support the reflections of others – such as children, pupils or friends. The workshop is highly interactive. It invites participants to share their ideas on how their favorite games relate to research findings, and includes discussions, game playing and analysis.


Wednesday July 8, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Beefeaters

1:00pm

Lunch and Playful Learning Report
The lunch session will feature a report from Beth King and Remi Holden about Playful Learning Summit efforts and the #gblgap, addressing the games that educators most want to meet various teaching and learning needs.

Speakers
avatar for Remi Holden

Remi Holden

GLS Playful Learning Summit Co-Chair, University of Colorado Denver
avatar for Beth King

Beth King

Assistant Professor, Educational Foundations, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater


Wednesday July 8, 2015 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Great Hall

2:30pm

What's Next?
What's Next?
Kurt Squire

Speakers

Wednesday July 8, 2015 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Capitol View

2:30pm

The GLS Museum of Natural History: Gaming Square Pegs into Dinosaur-shaped Holes
The GLS Museum of Natural History: Gaming Square Pegs into Dinosaur-shaped Holes
Barry Joseph, Nick Fortugno, Debra Everett-Lane

The American Museum of Natural History was founded in 1869 and soon became a world leader in presenting artifacts from nature and culture to the public. From magic lantern slides to immersive dioramas, it has innovated new pathways for visitors to connect with science and their place in the universe. In recent years, the Museum has explored a new cutting-edge dimension in the museum experience: game design. This panel will challenge participants to travel with us to the GLS Museum of Natural History. Led by our tour guides - a museum educator, a game designer, and an experience designer - participants will question and reinvent the idea of what a museum is by creating, interpreting, and playing with exhibits themselves. This experience leads into a larger discussion of game design at museums as reflected in three recent and diverse projects: MicroRangers, Playing With Dinos, and Killer Snails.

Speakers
avatar for Nick Fortugno

Nick Fortugno

Co-Founder and CCO, Playmatics
Nick Fortugno is a game designer and entrepreneur of digital and real-world games based in New York City, and a founder of Playmatics (www.playmatics.com), a game development company. Playmatics has created a variety of digital and real-world games for organization including Red Bull, AMC (such as the CableFAX award winning Breaking Bad: The Interrogation), Disney, American Museum of Natural History, the Corporation of Public Broadcasting, the... Read More →
avatar for Barry Joseph

Barry Joseph

Associate Director of Digital Learning, American Museum of Natural History
Barry Joseph is Associate Director of Digital Learning at the American Museum of Natural History. Since 2000, he has developed innovative programs in the areas of youth-produced video games, mobile and augmented learning, virtual worlds, digital fabrication, alternative assessments models, and more, always seeking to combine youth development practices with the development of high profile digital media projects that develop 21st Century Skills... Read More →


Wednesday July 8, 2015 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Main Lounge

2:30pm

Reluctant Learners
Pink Boxes and Chocolate-dipped Broccoli: Bad Game Design Providing Justifications for Reluctant Learners
Betsy DiSalvo

The use of games to make boring activities fun is usually a bad idea. The thoughtless use of points and badges as a method of “gamification” is usually a bad idea. Pandering to stereotypes about women by making games pink and on “girly” topics is usually a bad idea. Yet, these design tactics may provide face saving strategies for those who are reluctant to openly engage in learning. In this paper I review tactics such as sugar-coating learning with games, pointsification of educational experiences, and pink boxing games and ask why, if these are such bad design tactics, they sometimes work. In answering these questions the pretense of gaming and fun can be seen as a powerful justification for participation in learning.


Igniting Strategic Thinking Through ProblemUp!
Vittorio Marone, Cary Staples, Katherine Greenberg

Games can contribute to student learning in diverse settings. Social constructivism, situated learning, and social-historical theories support this; but what about students who lack a feeling of competence to learn through failing, who quietly drop out from school, or simply extinguish their desire to learn? The card game ProblemUp! derives its substance from the Cognitive Enrichment Advantage (CEA) approach, which provides the means for creating a community of practice where students adapt 22 specific strategies to meet personal needs in overcoming school, home, work, and interdependent learning problems. ProblemUp! focuses on helping underachieving students in high school and college settings by providing unusual, and often bizarre, game-generated problems that require creative solutions, strategic resourcefulness, and lateral thinking. Such “outside of the box” reasoning exercises supported by the CEA approach and enacted in a social and playful environment can help students develop metacognitive strategies that can be applied in real life.


A Space Without Tears:  The Kings, The Sims and Discovering Possibility
Beth King

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Betsy DiSalvo

Betsy DiSalvo

Assistant Professors, Georgia Institute of Technology
avatar for Cary Staples

Cary Staples

Professor : School of Art, University of Tennessee
my students call me the "designosaur". I am one of "those" who studied in Brissago. | I am a creative problem solver, designer, origami explorer, I love visualizing math. I have to learn to code in "processing" for my next idea, damn it. | My students helped me to design a game for my "Idea of Design" class to replace test, yeah. | I currently have a group of "rogue" students working on a game to teach french to undergraduate students... Read More →


Wednesday July 8, 2015 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Inn Wisconsin

2:30pm

Research Methods
The Use of Cognitive Clinical Interviews to Explore Learning From Video Game Play
Nathan Holbert, Rosemary Russ, Pryce Davis

As research about the learning that results when children play video games becomes more popular, questions arise about what methodological and analytical tools are most appropriate to access and document this learning. Thus far, researchers have mostly adopted pre/post assessments, ethnography, and learning analytics. In this paper we (re)introduce cognitive clinical interviews as a methodology particularly suited to answering many of the most pressing questions about games and learning. To that end we describe four challenges of studying learning in video games with pre-post assessments that we claim can be addressed by the addition of clinical interviews. We then consider how clinical interviews can help to explain and describe patterns detected from ethnographic observations and detailed game play logs.


100 Games in 5 Years
James Cox

For the past two and a half years, I’ve been working through a challenge, a goal that will carry on until June 1st, 2017: making and releasing 100 games in 5 years. This piece covers a bit on how the challenge came to be, how I’m doing now at the halfway mark, and what what there is to learn from this method of game development.


Situating Big Data Across Heterogeneous Data Sets of Game Data Exhaust, Class Assessment Measures, and Student Talk
Constance Steinkuehler, Matthew Berland, Kurt Squire, Craig G. Anderson, John Binzak,
Lauren Wielgus, David Azari, Jennifer Dalsen, Pasqueline Scaico

One of the defining questions for education over the next decade is, how do we shift education from a data poor to a data rich activity? (T. Kalil, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, personal communication, September 1, 2013) Over the previous decade, we have seen a rise in shared national and state standards and frameworks that articulate what we, as a country, believe young people and adults should be able to think, know, and do in order to be scientifically literate, but we are only now beginning to see a concomitant rise in large scale, data rich strategies for assessing such knowledge, skills, and dispositions. “Big data” techniques (the capture, curation, storage, and analysis of massive, complex data sets spanning large numbers of individuals in aggregate) have made significant progress in areas such as content knowledge, inquiry practice, and, to a lesser extent, interest, but we have significant work remaining in the areas such as identity, participation, and epistemology – domains historically studied through discourse analysis and other forms of qualitative, conversation-focused methods. The majority of data streams used in big data analyses are “data exhaust” from technologies considered largely in isolation: computer programs reports, intelligent tutoring user outputs, clickstream data sets generated from tablet devices, and user progressions harvested from educational games and the like. We know, however, that such technologies are sociotechnical artifacts (Bijker, 1995) whose potential for learning, like that of any instructional tool, is highly influenced by its context of use. Whether it’s a textbook, calculator, or high-end 3-D graphical data display, a tool is only as good as the activities and practices in which it is embedded. Thus, if we want to catalyze progress toward more expanded frameworks for learning goals that include tricky variables such as identity and dispositions, then, we must include not only the data streams from technology and tool use but also talk and interaction data that surround it. And we would be wise to build on the last several decades of discourse and content analytic techniques used routinely in more qualitatively oriented research.

This project seeks to marry theories of situated cognition to the big data movement by connecting clickstream data from technologies in isolation to key forms of multimodal data available from their contexts of use. Using a data corpus gathered from a five-day game-based implementation of the STEM game Virulent (targeting cellular biology) during an event called Game-A-Palooza, we are combining multiple analytic strategies commonly considered incommensurate: educational data mining, learning analytics, qualitative coding, quantification of qualitative coding, discourse analysis, natural language processing, and standard classroom assessments such as pre-/posttest measures and attitudinal surveys. Data include clickstream telemetry data, individual and group discourse, individual and curricular artifacts, classroom assessments, and online forum postings. In this presentation, we review the project goals and preliminary findings from the study, highlighting not just the progress we’ve made but also the significant challenges to this work. We discuss the benefits and drawbacks to analysis across heterogeneous data sets and our current attempts to better situate telemetric analyses and thereby provide more complete model for big data analysis, one that includes both talk and play data equally or, where not possible, identify find its limitations so that future “data rich” attempts on learning might be better informed by the limitations of technology-rich but talk-poor data sets.


Moderators
Speakers
CG

Craig G. Anderson

Grad student, University of Wisconsin - Madison
MB

Matthew Berland

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
avatar for John Binzak

John Binzak

Research Project Assistant, Games+Learning+Society
avatar for James Cox

James Cox

Digital Wizard, Seemingly Pointless
Making 100 games in 5 years. Graduate student in USC's Interactive Media and Games Design program.
PD

Pryce Davis

Evanston, Illinois, United States, Northwestern University


Wednesday July 8, 2015 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Old Madison

2:30pm

He Was The Most... Human: Ethical Play in Doki Doki Universe
He Was The Most... Human: Ethical Play in Doki Doki Universe
Kenneth Rosenberg

Doki Doki Universe is an adventure game in which players control QT3, a robot charged with the task of better understanding human nature. The narrative context of this game utilizes the modeling principle to teach players about prosocial behavior. Gameplay consists primarily of two systems: object-oriented, fetch-quest puzzles and personality quizzes. Players’ ethical agency is limited to dialogue choices and answers to personality questions that do not affect the overall story, but the game aggregates data from player choices in both systems to craft a personality profile which can be reviewed and modified. In this way, the game teaches reflection on empathy, logic, and personality traits. Though the game does not afford players moral agency, the game rules and world are still ethically relevant because they foster reflective practice of prosocial behavior.

Speakers
KR

Kenneth Rosenberg

Associate Instructor, Indiana University
I am interested in games which have mechanics that involve ethical decision-making, when and how players morally engage with narratives, and whether games can be used to teach reflective practice of moral agency.


Wednesday July 8, 2015 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Play Circle Theater

2:30pm

Social Change Games
"FOLLOW" Videogame
Magali Xicohtencatl, Diana Sánchez, Roberto Razo Rodríguez

Follow it's a serious video game that we are developing as part of a project to raise awareness about the use of social networks as a means to capture young women for trafficking in Mexico.


Troubled Lands: A Sustainability Game
Thomas Fennewald

Troubled Lands is an open source, 30-min educational game about sustainability for ages 13 to Adult. It is a simple to learn yet morally provocative social dilemma game that requires players to address competing motivations of self-preservation and group loyalty as players need to apply moral reasoning to address inequalities and conflicts of interests. Many sustainability themes including communal negotiation, governance, inequality, power, and the tragedy of the commons are present in the game.

Designing Tenacity
Mike Beall, John Binzak, Craig Anderson, Lauren Wielgus, David Azari, Jennifer Dalson, Kurt Squire, Constance Steinkuehler

The Tenacity project is a collaboration between meditation experts and neuroscientists at the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds (Richard Davidson, Director) and game designers and learning scientists at the Games+Learning+Society Center (Constance Steinkuehler and Kurt Squire, Directors). Our goal was to facilitate and support the practice of mindfulness through a digital application and ultimately research the behavioral and neural effects. The nature of this interdisciplinary work is exciting and groundbreaking, but creating an engaging experience that stays true to the practice of meditation comes with its own challenges. Unlike most games and digital applications, the goal of meditation is not easily mapped to standard “win” states common to games.  Practicing mindfulness is, in a way, somewhat orthogonal to the idea of earning a high score, beating a boss monster, or obtaining some rare drop. Rather, the goal here is to let go of the win state itself and instead become more self-aware and thus master not the game system but your own mind. Standard design elements that make a game engaging were, over repeated iteration in this project, reined in or stripped out entirely so as to stay true to the main “verb” within the game – self-regulation of one’s attention rather than seduction by a well-designed and “sticky” digital stimulus.  Once our builds reached the hands of our adolescent participants, however, engagement was sorely lacking. Even when we reframed the builds as “gamified apps” with an achievement system but no core game mechanics per se, our target audience of teen- and tween-agers wanted something more recognizable, engaging, and sticky. In this Worked Example, we discuss our game design and redesigns in terms of telemetry data extracted from kleenex tests and a two-week experimental trial, the questions and conclusions we have now about this effort, and how we’ve shifted not only graphics and game mechanics but core audience.


Moderators
avatar for Elisabeth Gee

Elisabeth Gee

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
I'm the Associate Director of the Center for Games & Impact at ASU, and co-directing the Play2Connect initiative with Dr. Sinem Siyahhan at Cal State-San Marcos. I'm interested in gender and gaming, game-based affinity spaces, and intergenerational play.

Speakers
CG

Craig G. Anderson

Grad student, University of Wisconsin - Madison
avatar for John Binzak

John Binzak

Research Project Assistant, Games+Learning+Society
avatar for Roberto Razo Rodríguez

Roberto Razo Rodríguez

Universidad Iberoamericana Puebla


Wednesday July 8, 2015 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Class of '24

3:30pm

Coffee Break & Snack
Wednesday July 8, 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Great Hall

4:00pm

Adapting Game Design Strategies to Increase Youth Participation in Equitable Learning Opportunities
Adapting Game Design Strategies to Increase Youth Participation in Equitable Learning Opportunities
Nichole Pinkard

Nichole Pinkard is an Associate Professor and Chair of the School of Design in the College of Computing and Digital Media at DePaul University in Chicago. She is the founder of Digital Youth Network, co-founder of Inquirium LLC and Remix Learning LLC, home of iRemix, a social learning platform that connects youth’s learning opportunities in school, home, and beyond.

In collaboration with the Chicago Public Library, Dr. Pinkard helped establish YOUmedia, a public learning space that immerses high school students in a context of traditional media—books—to make and produce new media artifacts like music, games, videos, and virtual worlds.

Dr. Pinkard is the recipient of a 2014 Northwestern Alumni Award, a 2010 Common Sense Media Award for Outstanding Commitment to Creativity and Youth, and the 2004 the Jan Hawkins Award for Early Career Contributions to Humanistic Research and Scholarship in Learning Technologies, an NSF Early CAREER Fellowship. She holds a B.S. in Computer Science from Stanford University, an M.S. in Computer Science and a Ph.D. in Learning Sciences from Northwestern University.

Her current scholarly interests include the creation of city-wide learning ecologies, design and use of pedagogical-based social networks, new media literacy learning environments, ecological models of learning, digital badging, computational-making learning environments for underrepresented groups, and designing city-level learning ecologies.

Speakers
avatar for Nichole Pinkard

Nichole Pinkard

Nichole Pinkard is an Associate Professor and Chair of the School of Design in the College of Computing and Digital Media at DePaul University in Chicago. She is the founder of Digital Youth Network, co-founder of Inquirium LLC and Remix Learning LLC, home of iRemix, a social learning platform that connects youth’s learning opportunities in school, home, and beyond. | | In collaboration with the Chicago Public Library, Dr. Pinkard helped... Read More →


Wednesday July 8, 2015 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Capitol View

4:00pm

An Inside Look at Getting and Using Games in Classrooms
An Inside Look at Getting and Using Games in Classrooms
Matthew Farber, Steve Isaacs, Jessica Millstone, Jordan Shapiro

The use of games in the classroom has gained attention and momentum in recent years, but despite the growing understanding of the value of games, its use has yet to become a mainstream approach to teaching and learning. There remain a number of barriers to get games into the classroom. Through this panel, we would like to share positive approaches to using games to enhance student learning, as well as to discuss strategies to overcome barriers. This panel will also address practical and logistical solutions to encourage games in education to become ubiquitous, as well as ideas to spread best practices through teacher communities.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew  Farber

Matthew Farber

Teacher and Adjunct, New Jersey City University
Matthew Farber, Ed.D. teaches social studies at Valleyview Middle School, in Denville, New Jersey. He holds a doctorate degree in Educational Technology Leadership. His research pertains to how experts in game-based learning communities use games in their classrooms. Farber is a recipient of the HistoryQuest Fellowship from the Woodrow Wilson Foundation and the Institute of Play, an Edutopia blogger, cohost of Ed Got Game on BAM Radio, and a... Read More →
avatar for Steve Isaacs

Steve Isaacs

Teacher, Bernards Township Board of Ed
Steve has been a gamer since the days of Atari and his Apple II+. His parents were initially concerned with how consumed he was with technology. Now they chuckle as he has created a career around his passion. Steve has been teaching Video Game Design and Development for 15 years, starting with his innovative programming at Liberty Corner Computing, the interactive training and gaming center that he and his wife owned and operated for 10 years... Read More →
JM

Jessica Millstone

Director of Engagement, BrainPOP


Wednesday July 8, 2015 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Main Lounge

4:00pm

Analysis of Game-Based Interaction
Walking and Talking as a Group: Interactional Practices for Playing an Augmented Reality game on a Mobile Digital Device
Steven Thorne, John Hellermann, Adam Jones, Danny Lester

To better understand the use of mobile digital technology for place-based language learning, and more generally as a factor in human interaction, this paper describes the methods used by small groups to accomplish quest-type tasks in an augmented reality (AR) game. The ARIS game (arisgames.org) was available on mobile devices (iPhones) and played outside the classroom. Video-recordings of each group were made using two head-mounted cameras and one hand-held camera. Analysis focused on the groups’ orientation to the device as they accomplished game activity. Results show that the device and the holder of the device were frequently oriented to for instruction and leadership via verbal and non-verbal communication. We outline communicative practices used by the groups, how participants made information from the game publicly available to one another, and how they interfaced cartographic resources and the physical environment in way finding activity.


Digital Media, Early Learning, and the Impact of Mediation on Child Learning Outcomes
Danae Kamdar, Megan Silander, Naomi Hupert, Savitha Moorthy, Sarah Gerard

Digital games and media resources are often designed to teach particular skills or concepts, and mediation can have an impact in supporting those intended learning outcomes. We refer to mediation to describe the role that an adult plays in supporting, guiding, and demonstrating game play as well as curation, or the sequencing or grouping of game play activities in targeted ways. We examine and describe ways in which educators, parents and families can mediate children’s game-play and media use that can support positive learning outcomes in formal and informal learning environments. We also discuss how the curation of digital media experiences for children that are engaging and that integrate elements of a particular skill area can promote learning. To inform this discussion, we draw from multiple studies examining preschool-age children’s use of digital media and the impacts on learning.


Distributed Teaching and Learning Systems in Dota 2
Jeffrey Holmes

Teaching and learning are often distributed across many different sites and across time, and teachers and learners can intentionally create and customize trajectories through these encounters. However, we often tend to focus on one site or design for learning. Furthermore, we often fail to recognize the teaching acts used by games and only focus on the rich learning. This paper argues that we can think about “Big ‘T’ Teaching” (using Gee’s “Big ‘G’ Games as a model) where teaching is a distributed system; this view allows us to trace an “ecology” of teaching and learning systems (borrowing from Jenkin’s approach to media). Using the game Dota 2, this paper demonstrates one way of thinking about the way teachers and designers can make compelling, distributed systems of teaching that extend through and even beyond the game, and how players and learners can customize their learning experiences.

Moderators
avatar for Deborah Fields

Deborah Fields

Independent Research Consultant & Temporary Assistant Professor of Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences, Utah State University
Dr. Deborah A. Fields is a Temporary Assistant Professor in Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University and an independent research consultant. Deborah researches children’s connective learning and identity engagement through designing with digital technologies in ways that bridge informal and formal learning contexts. She is the co-PI on the Kids' DIY Media Project (kidsdiymedia.com) aimed at identifying and... Read More →

Speakers

Wednesday July 8, 2015 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Old Madison

4:00pm

Customization & Play Styles
Shapes and Patterns of Adaptive Game-Based Learning: An Experiment
Josine Verhagen, David Hatfield, Julie Watson, Solomon Liu, Dylan Arena

It is often claimed that adaptive educational games keep the learner more engaged and maximize the learning taking place in the game. We explored these two claims by evaluating adaptive and non-adaptive forms of a pattern- and shape-recognition game for preschoolers. We used a Bayesian IRT model to make this game adapt in real time to the learner’s performance. Results indicate that adaptivity led to higher engagement, and we found some evidence of greater learning. We also note some important prerequisites for the success of adaptive games.


Designing and Tracking Play Styles in Solving the Incognitum
Josep Valls-Vargas, Andrew Kahl, Justin Patterson, Glen Muschio, Aroutis Foster, Jichen Zhu

Better understanding of players' motivation and their in-game play patterns is crucial to build educational games that can be adapted to individuals' learning preferences. Although the traditional instruments of motivation can suggest one's intrinsic orientation, they do not always correlate with the observable in-game activities (i.e., play style) as the latter are affected by many other factors. In this paper, we first present a play-based interactive learning environment called Solving the Incognitum, designed to support different play styles. We also present our initial data from a user study (n=75), focusing on the correlation between intrinsic motivation and the play styles the learners adopted.


Playing with Gender: Examining How Learning Games Can Adapt to User Characteristics to Maximize Positive Outcomes
Rabindra Ratan, Denice Blair, Joseph Fordham, John Besley, Paul Powell, Tommy Schutter, Zachary Terry

This study explores the role of gender—as a continuous construct—within interactions between media users and game characters in digital learning games. Using a museum-based science-learning game with scientist characters designed to serve as experimental stimuli, we examined how the relationship between character gender, player gender and player age influence motivation in a science-learning game. Analyses suggest that the scientist characters’ masculinity or femininity influenced male and female players’ motivation differently, but that the specific manifestation of such influence appears to vary for different age groups. These results suggest that the characters in science-learning games could be designed to adapt to the players’ characteristics in order increase their science content learning or interest in STEM fields. More generally, this study highlights the importance of considering player characteristics in game design and the potential of adapting to such characteristics in order to maximize meaningful outcomes.

Moderators
avatar for Stephen Slota

Stephen Slota

Co-Founder, The Pericles Group, LLC
Steve (@steveslota) is an instructional design specialist and game design scientist at the University of Connecticut Health Center and a co-founder of The Pericles Group, LLC. He holds a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology: Cognition, Instruction, & Learning Technologies and has worked on a variety of game and instructional design projects with organizations including Arizona State University's Center for Games & Impact, Intel Corporation, and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dylan Arena

Dylan Arena

Co-founder and Chief Learning Scientist, Kidaptive, Inc.
I've spent my life learning, playing, and helping people learn by playing. At Kidaptive, we create playful educational experiences for kids built upon a comprehensive early-learning curriculum and assessment framework. What I'm passionate about is extending that work to support early learners across a wide variety of contexts (formal and informal, online and offline).
DH

David Hatfield

Director of Assessment, Kidaptive
GM

Glen Muschio

Associate Professor, Drexel University
RR

Rabindra Ratan

East Lansing, MI, United States, Michigan State University
avatar for Josine Verhagen, PhD

Josine Verhagen, PhD

Director of Psychometrics, Kidaptive
I have a background in statistics and psychometrics, and I recently joined Kidaptive to work on statistical models to adapt games to learners. I am interested in adaptive educational games, learning analytics, (Bayesian) statistics and educational data mining | https://www.researchgate.net/profile/A_J_Verhagen


Wednesday July 8, 2015 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Inn Wisconsin

4:00pm

Madden 15
Madden 15
Kurt Squire, Walter Squire


Wednesday July 8, 2015 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Play Circle Theater

4:00pm

Math Games
Tiny Points In Space - Using Virtual Reality to Visualize Calculus
Eric Russell, Aline Click, Jason Underwood

The goal of this project is to create an inexpensive virtual reality experience to help users better visualize the three-dimensional models, representations, and graphs that are critical to learning advanced mathematics like Calculus. Using relatively inexpensive hardware (a computer, the Oculus Rift and a game controller) and open source software developed as a part of this project, we would like to give advanced mathematics students and instructors a new way to explore three-dimensional representations of mathematics from a first person, immersive perspective.


Mobile Movement Mathematics (M3): Discussing Iterative (re)Design of a Digital Tablet Tutor-Game for Learning FrActions
Michael Swart, Ben Friedman, Sorachai Kornkasem, John Black, Jon Vitale, Sandra Sheppard, Kristin DiQuallo

Researchers developed Iteration-1 (i1) of a digital tablet tutor-game exploring the impact of narratives (strong (S) vs. weak (W)) and gestural mechanics (conceptual (C) vs. deictic (D)) on players’ understanding of mathematical fractions. Tutor-log data revealed that students using conceptual gestures were significantly more accurate at estimating and denominating fractions than students using deictic gestures and a possible interaction between narrative and gesture. We discuss how these findings, combined with observational notes, student exit surveys and clinical interviews, informed ludological revisions for the redesign of assets, mechanics, pedagogy (instructions/scaffolding/feedback) and narrative for Iteration 2 (i2).


Alice in Arealand
Kristen DiCerbo, Chris Crowell, Michael John

Alice in Arealand focuses on teaching and assessing geometric measurement, specifically the understanding of area. Many curricula and classes still focus on teaching the formula area = length x width. However, students miss the significance of what the resulting number indicates, namely the number of square units that can fill the space. The key challenge for the game is to simultaneously 1) be engaging 2) scaffold students through the research-based learning progression and 3) gather evidence for the creation of assessment models that indicate whether students have mastered the stages of the progression.

This worked example describes the evolution of game design from multiple perspectives (learning, assessment, and engagement). Using the description of one design problem, it illustrates the push and pull among the perspectives, and a situation where they come to similar conclusions for different reasons.


Moderators
avatar for Dennis Ramirez

Dennis Ramirez

Technical Director, USC IMGD, Videogame Researcher

Speakers
avatar for Aline Click

Aline Click

Director, Digital Convergence Lab and eLearning Services, Northern Illinois University
Director of the Digital Convergence Lab at Northern Illinois University. Research on girls and video game, STEM, and gender issues. Interests include, teaching video game design, virtual worlds as learning environments, online education, and cockatoos.
avatar for Kristen DiCerbo

Kristen DiCerbo

Vice President of Education Research, Pearson
Kristen is the Vice-President of Education Research at Pearson, working to integrate learning science research into digital products. Her personal research program centers around game-based assessment, specifically the collaborative design of games as both learning and assessment tools and the use of statistical models to turn data into evidence of student knowledge, skills, and attributes. She has worked on a computer networking game at Cisco... Read More →


Wednesday July 8, 2015 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Class of '24

4:00pm

Playtesting Games 2: The Sequeling
Playtesting Games 2: The Sequeling
Mark Chen, Marshall Behringer, Carrie Cole, Ellen Jameson, Heather Messer

Playtesting should be a part of any game design cycle, since most games aren’t good games until they’ve been through multiple iterations of refinement based on player feedback. This workshop allows conference participants to test out in-development games from other participants, including many student teams from Clark Street Community School, providing that valuable feedback and bringing the featured games closer to being good.

Thanks to the participants sharing their games in this session: Owen Gottlieb, Jason Engerman, Tom Fennewald, Doug Maynard, Barry Joseph, Hannah Jaris, and Joel Langston.

Speakers
avatar for Marshall Behringer

Marshall Behringer

Madison, WI, USA, Filament Games
Marshall is the Community Development & Outreach Specialist at Filament Games. A former educator, he grows and engages with the community of educators and classrooms that Filament works with on a regular basis. He directs user testing and advocates for teacher and learner needs as Filament designs and develops their learning games.
avatar for Mark Chen

Mark Chen

Accidental Hero and Layabout, Independent
non-tenure track positions. | life after a PhD. | gaming culture and power/agency in gaming practice. | esoteric gaming practices, workarounds, and hacks. | subversion, representation, margins. | board games.


Wednesday July 8, 2015 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Beefeaters

5:00pm

Allison Mishkin
A Beacon in the Museum: Findings from a Pilot Study using iBeacons within a Mobile AR Game in a Natural History Museum
Judy Perry, Ellen Finch, Lisa Stump

A Day in the Life of Winslow Homer:  An Interactive Tour of Primate Behavioral Ecology
Matt Ziegler

A Scavenger Hunt vs. an ARG as a Library Orientation Activity
Kelly Giles

A Tale of Two Schools: Terrain and Resources in Virtual Games and Physical Communities
Mary Stewart, Danielle Hagood, Cynthia Ching

An Unlikely Partnership: Problem-Solving With Lara Croft
Nathaniel McLachlain, Shawna Kelly, Finn John

Analyzing Game Discourse Using Moral Foundations Theory
Thomas Fennewald

Assessing Student Growth in a Constructivist and Integrated Digital Curriculum
Annalee Good, Rebecca Vonesh

Avatars in Education FTW: An Examination of How Avatar Use Influences Student Communication, Understanding, and Performance Motivation
Rabindra Ratan, Young June Sah, Celina Wanek, Lee Johnson, Madison McKinley, RV Rikard

Beyond Collaboration, Cooperation, and Competition: A Typology of Player Goals in Games as Metaphors for Life
Thomas Fennewald, Ellen Jameson, Emily Sheepy

Building a Community:  Games in Library Training and Development
Andrew Evans, Kelly Giles

Building Worlds and Learning Astronomy on Facebook
James Harold, Dean Hines, Kate Haley Goldman, Evaldas Vidugiris

Designing a Social Skills Serious Game for Individuals With Autism
Elisabeth Whyte, Joshua Smyth, K. Suzanne Scherf

Designing for Negotiation within Structure
Isaac Nichols, Katherine Chapman

Educational Roles and Structures of Interaction in a Minecraft Affinity Space
Joey Huang, Sean Duncan

Exploring Teachers’ Pedagogical Approaches and Strategies in Designing Educational Games
Yun-Jo An, Li Cao

Game On at NCAR: Infusing a Major Climate Research Center with Game-based Education
Randy Russell

Gaming with New Players: Should You Self-Handicap? Should They Know?
Douglas Maynard, Laura Kopczynski, Emily Smith, Connor Pierce

Goal Orientated Activity in Story Games
Chris Georgen

Hope in Troubled Lands: Supporting Student Inquiry with a Sustainability Simulation Game
Joli Sandoz

How Games Support Teachers’ Formative Assessment Practice
Barry Fishman, Rachel Snider, Michelle Riconscente, Tzuchi Tsai, Jan Plass

Keeping it Old School: Classic Video Games as Inspiration for Modern Student Programs
David Weintrop, Uri Wilensky

Learning Outcomes In Adults Playing and Self-debriefing  Get Water!, a Game for Change
Emily Sheepy, David I. Waddington

Location-based games and the Matter of Invention
Cleci Maraschin, Renata Kroeff, Fernando Teles, Raquel Salcedo Gomes, Poti Gavillon

Playing With History: An Analysis of Interactive Learning Through a Museum Exhibit
Nicolaas VanMeerten, Jennifer Sly

Project NEO: Assessing Preservice Teacher Science Content Knowledge with a Video Game
Timothy Young, Richard Van Eck, Mark Guy, Austin Winger, Scott Brewster

Redesign: Using Educator and Student Feedback to Enhance Functionality and UI
Adam Hott, Kelly East, Neil Lamb

Roles People Play: Key Roles that promote participation and learning in Alternate Reality Games
Elizabeth Bonsignore, Derek Hansen

Same Game, Different Players: Second Language Learning and Gaming Trajectories in a Multiplayer Online Game
Jinjing Zhao

Students Taking Charge: EPX Animation and Gaming Conference
Megan Mathews, Ryan Holtkamp, Eric Neuhaus

Testing Engagement Improvement in the Serious Educational Videogame: Cerebrex Ultimate
Ali Lemus, Hugo Enriquez, Byron Ajin

The Fate of the World is in Your Hands: Exploring The Educational Impact of a Climate Change Game
David Waddington, Thomas Fennewald

The Great STEM Caper
Dana Atwood-Blaine

The Role of Story in Computer Science Games for Girls
Elisabeth Gee, Kelly Tran, Carolee Stewart, Gail Carmichael, Lorri Hopping

Transformational Play Spaces For Microeconomics with EconU
Jason Alphonso Engerman, Chris Stubbs

Understanding Conceptual Engagement and Accuracy in an Assessment Game
Allison Mishkin, Will Jordan-Cooley, Kevin Miklasz

Using Games to Teach Global Interconnectedness
Matthew Farber

Visual Attention to a Dynamic Video Game Stimulus in Individuals with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder
Benjamin Hickerson, Erinn Finke, Krista Wilkinson

What Game Are You Playing? Affordances of Tools for Incorporating Game Elements into Classrooms
Caitlin Holman, Stephanie Wooten, Barry Fishman

What Lactose Intolerance, Peristalsis, and Chicken Nuggets Have in Common: Using Card Sorting to Inform the Content of a Digital Game
Minnie Wu, Joshua Tjokrosurjo, Patricia Cortez, Peter McPartlan, Cathy Tran, Katerina Schenke

When Good Games Promote Good Programming: Scratch Camp FTW
Xavier Velasquez, Deborah Fields

Speakers
avatar for Dana Atwood-Blaine

Dana Atwood-Blaine

Assistant Professor/Science Fellow, University of Northern Iowa
Elementary Science Education | Location-based Mobile Learning Games | ARIS with kids
avatar for Cynthia Ching

Cynthia Ching

Associate Professor of Learning and Mind Sciences, University of California, Davis
Technology and identity, personal data gaming, embodied cognition, games and behavior.
avatar for Sean Duncan

Sean Duncan

Assistant Professor, Indiana University
avatar for Kelly East

Kelly East

Genetic Counselor, HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology
avatar for Hugo  Enriquez

Hugo Enriquez

Guatemala, Galileo University
Games and Learning, Game Design, Game Development, Gaming, Game Industry, JRPGs
AE

Andrew Evans

Harrisonburg, VA, USA, James Madison University
avatar for Matthew  Farber

Matthew Farber

Teacher and Adjunct, New Jersey City University
Matthew Farber, Ed.D. teaches social studies at Valleyview Middle School, in Denville, New Jersey. He holds a doctorate degree in Educational Technology Leadership. His research pertains to how experts in game-based learning communities use games in their classrooms. Farber is a recipient of the HistoryQuest Fellowship from the Woodrow Wilson Foundation and the Institute of Play, an Edutopia blogger, cohost of Ed Got Game on BAM Radio, and a... Read More →
avatar for Deborah Fields

Deborah Fields

Independent Research Consultant & Temporary Assistant Professor of Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences, Utah State University
Dr. Deborah A. Fields is a Temporary Assistant Professor in Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University and an independent research consultant. Deborah researches children’s connective learning and identity engagement through designing with digital technologies in ways that bridge informal and formal learning contexts. She is the co-PI on the Kids' DIY Media Project (kidsdiymedia.com) aimed at identifying and... Read More →
EF

Erinn Finke

University Park, PA, USA, Penn State University
avatar for Barry Fishman

Barry Fishman

Ann Arbor, MI, United States of America, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Gameful learning, GradeCraft, motivation, higher education
avatar for Elisabeth Gee

Elisabeth Gee

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
I'm the Associate Director of the Center for Games & Impact at ASU, and co-directing the Play2Connect initiative with Dr. Sinem Siyahhan at Cal State-San Marcos. I'm interested in gender and gaming, game-based affinity spaces, and intergenerational play.
avatar for Kelly Giles

Kelly Giles

Applied Sciences Librarian, James Madison University
Games in higher education, academic libraries, information literacy, the eternal struggle against plagiarism, adventure games, text adventure games, board games.
KH

Kate Haley Goldman

Principal, Audience Viewpoints Consulting
avatar for Danielle Hagood

Danielle Hagood

PhD Student, University of California, Davis
JH

James Harold

Space Science Institute
avatar for Benjamin Hickerson

Benjamin Hickerson

The Pennsylvania State University
DH

Dean Hines

Space Science Institute/Space Telescope Science Institute
CH

Caitlin Holman

Ann Arbor, MI, United States of America, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
avatar for Adam Hott

Adam Hott

Digital Applications Lead, HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology
avatar for Joey Huang

Joey Huang

Indiana University, United States of America
I am a doctoral student in Indiana University’s Learning Sciences program. My research interests include affinity spaces, informal learning, and learning through social media. In particular, I am interested in developing creative and innovative learning environments. I recently draw my research interest into a triangle shape with respect to three aspects – computational thinking, constructionism settings/spaces, and cultural variation. As a... Read More →
avatar for William Jordan-Cooley

William Jordan-Cooley

Instructional Designer, BrainPOP
Will is an Instructional Designer specializing in educational games. At BrainPOP, Will works on GameUp, a curated collection of over 100 educational games with K12 alignments and teacher support materials. | | Will obtained his M.A. in Instructional Technology and Media from Columbia University Teachers College, where he collaborated with Dr. Joey Lee, the Eggplant Games Lab and the NSF-funded POLAR research group on a variety of games... Read More →
LJ

Lee Johnson Jr

IT, Contractor
avatar for Megan Mathews

Megan Mathews

Learning Technology Programming Coordinator, The University of Iowa
avatar for Doug Maynard

Doug Maynard

Professor, SUNY New Paltz
I am interested in the study of games (especially analog games) as they relate to learning, social interaction, well-being and other aspects of positive psychology. My research team and I have designed non-digital games and are currently investigating various aspects of board game experiences.
PM

Peter McPartlan

Doctoral Student, University of California, Irvine
avatar for Kevin Miklasz

Kevin Miklasz

Assessment Specialist, BrainPOP
I work on the design of new playful assessments on BrainPOP's website, and the analysis of the clickstream data that results from such assessments. I describe myself as a gamer, foodie, scientists and educator in no particular order. I love teaching kids using games and game design, I like creating games myself and I like analyzing them.
avatar for Judy Perry

Judy Perry

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Judy currently oversees design, development and research for several projects involving games and simulations for mobile devices, including smartphones and tablets. Her research interests include location-based games and ubiquitous “casual” games. When she is not making or playing mobile games, Judy also leads professional development workshops for educators who want to implement location-based and other games in both formal and informal... Read More →
RR

Rabindra Ratan

East Lansing, MI, United States, Michigan State University
avatar for Randy Russell

Randy Russell

Game & Interactive Multimedia Developer, UCAR Center for Science Education
Science Education
JS

Jen Sly

Manager of Digital Learning & Assessment, Minnesota Historical Society
Jennifer Sly leads the new Digital Learning and Assessment group at the Minnesota Historical Society. Other projects she has led are the Play the Past and “Reinventing the Field Trip for the 21st Century” projects.  For the past 15 years, Jennifer has worked at the intersection of technology and education in informal learning environments.  Jennifer has a B.A. from St. Olaf College in Math and Music and an M.P.A. from the... Read More →
CS

Carolee Stewart

Union, NJ, Kean University
avatar for Mary Stewart

Mary Stewart

PhD Candidate, University of California, Davis
avatar for Chris Stubbs

Chris Stubbs

Project Manager, Educational Gaming Commons
avatar for Cathy Tran

Cathy Tran

Researcher, UC Irvine
http://education.uci.edu/person/tran_c/tran_c_bio.php
KM

Kelly M. Tran

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
avatar for Nicolaas VanMeerten

Nicolaas VanMeerten

Data Scientist, GLITCH
Anything! :)
RV

Rebecca Vonesh

Program Director, WCATY
Rebecca, Program Director of the Academy, has dabbled in the details of classroom culture in a variety of school settings. Her experience in the classroom is rooted in a constructivist approach. After years of exploring online communication, Rebecca understands how to teach higher level skills through guiding student-to-student interaction.
DW

David Weintrop

Northwestern University
avatar for Elisabeth Whyte

Elisabeth Whyte

Post-doc, The Pennsylvania State University
Developmental Psychology post-doc interested in the development of educational technology for improving social communication abilities for individuals with autism.
KW

Krista Wilkinson

University Park, PA, USA, Penn State University


Wednesday July 8, 2015 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Great Hall

7:00pm

Coffee: A Misunderstanding

Coffee: A Misunderstanding is an interactive play created as part of Squinky Kiai’s MFA thesis work. The way the game works is that two audience volunteers are called up and asked to read from a mobile device, which dynamically displays dialogue lines and stage directions. Meanwhile, two additional audience volunteers are given a mobile device on which they can select from a menu of choices that appear at key decision points in the story. It’s a combination of multiplayer Choose Your Own Adventure and improv theatre, resulting in a play experience that’s every bit as awkward as the story it’s trying to tell.

 



Wednesday July 8, 2015 7:00pm - 8:00pm
Great Hall

8:00pm

Arcade
Wednesday July 8, 2015 8:00pm - 9:00pm
Tripp Commons
 
Thursday, July 9
 

9:00am

Breakfast and Keynote
Mother, Woman, Girl: A Lifetime in Games
Brenda Romero

The last year brings into sharp focus and long perspective what it means to be a gamer, a game developer, a person, a woman, a mother in games. From creating games for one's own demographic to campaigning for diversity to sitting in regretful silence, it’s been a period of intense reflection, not just for women but for all of us, we who make and play games. What have we learned and where did we learn it from? In this (actually quite positive) talk, Brenda Romero resists a “lean in” and instead stands fast to talk about what it means to be a girl, woman and mother in games.

Speakers
avatar for Brenda Romero

Brenda Romero

Brenda Romero is an award-winning game designer, Fulbright scholar, entrepreneur, artist, writer and creative director who entered the video game industry in 1981. Brenda has worked with a variety of digital game companies as a game designer, creative director or consultant, including Atari, Sir-tech Software, Electronic Arts and numerous companies in the social and mobile space. She is presently the Program Director of UC Santa Cruz’s... Read More →


Thursday July 9, 2015 9:00am - 10:00am
Great Hall

10:30am

Ask Me Anything
Ask Me Anything
Brenda Romero

Brenda Romero is an award-winning game designer, Fulbright scholar, entrepreneur, artist, writer and creative director who entered the video game industry in 1981. Brenda has worked with a variety of digital game companies as a game designer, creative director or consultant, including Atari, Sir-tech Software, Electronic Arts and numerous companies in the social and mobile space. She is presently the Program Director of UC Santa Cruz’s Master’s in Games & Playable Media Program, Co-founder / Chief Executive Officer of Loot Drop, a casual game company, and an independent game developer at Romero Games, LLC. Brenda has extensive experience in PC, console and casual gaming. She is a 2014 Fulbright Scholar, and the recipient of the 2013 Women in Games Lifetime Achievement Award awarded by Microsoft.

Romero was previously a nominee in Microsoft’s 2010 Women in Games game design award. In 2013, she was listed as one of the industry’s top 10 game developers by Gamasutra.com, along with the likes of industry giants Naughty Dog, Nintendo and Rockstar North. Develop magazine also listed her among the 25 people who changed games in 2013. Romero was also named one of Forbes’ “12 Women in Gaming to Watch” in 2013, one of the top 20 most influential women in the game industry by Gamasutra.com in 2008 and one of the 100 most influential women in the game industry by Next Generation magazine in 2007. Nerve magazine also called her one of the 50 artists, actors, authors, activists and icons who are making the world a more stimulating place.

Ask her anything!


Speakers
avatar for Brenda Romero

Brenda Romero

Brenda Romero is an award-winning game designer, Fulbright scholar, entrepreneur, artist, writer and creative director who entered the video game industry in 1981. Brenda has worked with a variety of digital game companies as a game designer, creative director or consultant, including Atari, Sir-tech Software, Electronic Arts and numerous companies in the social and mobile space. She is presently the Program Director of UC Santa Cruz’s... Read More →


Thursday July 9, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Capitol View

10:30am

From Research to Commercialization
From Research to Commercialization
Lee Wilson, Jenna Hoffstein, Justin Leites, Louise Dube, Jim Bower, Mat Frenz

How do learning games make the jump from research to commercial release? Attendees will learn about the range of options from business leaders engaged in building this new market. Games developed to address research questions are often orphaned when grants expire. To reach a broader audience and self-sustainability they usually need significant additional investment in polish and marketing. The approaches represented on the panel include direct sales to teachers, app store sales to parents, institutional sales, comprehensive curriculum, non-profit fundraising, sponsorships, and assessment platforms. Several of the panelists are pursuing multiple paths. The panel will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, how the money flows, how much investment is needed, and how to protect the integrity of your work and research.


Thursday July 9, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Main Lounge

10:30am

Meta Discussion
Digital Games, Design, and Learning: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Douglas Clark, Emily Tanner-Smith, Stephen Killingsworth

This meta-analysis systematically reviews research on digital games and learning for K-16 students in light of the recent NRC report on education for life and work in the 21st century. We synthesize comparisons of game conditions versus non-game conditions (i.e., media comparisons) as well as comparisons of augmented game designs versus equivalent standard game designs (i.e., value-added comparisons). We employed random-effects meta-analysis with robust variance estimates to summarize the overall effects of digital game interventions. Meta-regression models were used to assess the possible moderating effects of participant characteristics, game condition characteristics, and research quality characteristics. Findings from the media comparisons indicate that games significantly enhanced student learning relative to the non-game control conditions. Findings from value-added comparisons clearly demonstrate the importance of design beyond medium when evaluating the impact of digital games for learning. Media-comparison and value-added analyses underscore the importance of enhanced assessment techniques and research reporting going forward.


An Empirical Comparison of a Video Game, Digital Video, and a Printed Text for Recall, Comprehension and Solving a STEM Word Problem
Brock Dubbels

When compared to a digital video, or a printed text, a video game should be more considerate for promoting learning, requiring much less cognitive processing for recall comprehension, and problem solving. A video game provides multimodal representation to diminish the need for visualization strategies and prior knowledge. It also structures incremental learning through practice, feedback, and rehearsal—activities traditionally offered by a teacher in one-on-one training for the development of learning strategies. A sample of 132 students was randomly assigned to one of three media conditions, controlled for interaction and feedback (Κ=.75). Each participant was pretested for prior knowledge, working memory, comprehension, reading ability, and media preference. Massive effect sizes indicated that the game was much more effective for identification of causal relationships between narrative events, indicating improved recall, comprehension, problem solving through analysis of multiple assessments including protocol analysis (construction of walkthrough), multiple choice questions, and a word problem.


Educational Games: Insights for Acceptance
Charles Kinzer, Maria Hwang, Dao Chantes, Ahram Choi, Shu-Yi Hsu

This study extends previous work (Author, 2013), through a survey of game designers. The work presented here provides insights into decisions made by game designers designing educational, as opposed to entertainment-focused, games in an attempt to link design and development decisions to the infusion of games into classrooms by addressing barriers to classroom adoption. Questions addressed included: What are the decisions that go into determining what games are produced, what educational theories are embedded in designs (and how are those decisions made), what determines the content areas targeted by design decisions, and how does game designers' use of educational focus groups and marketing strategies influence adoption of educational games?

Moderators
avatar for Mark DeLoura

Mark DeLoura

Former White House
Games for education, computer science literacy, White House adventures, game technology. Green tea.

Speakers
AC

Ahram Choi

Teachers College, Columbia University
avatar for Douglas Clark

Douglas Clark

Vanderbilt University
www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jaznkUOW6E | chais 2013 talk (1 hour) | | http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlMfk5rP9yI&feature=youtu.be | cyberlearning summit 2012 talk (10 minutes) | | Doug Clark's research investigates the learning processes through which people come to understand core science concepts. This work focuses primarily on conceptual change, explanation, collaboration, and argumentation. Clark's research often explores these... Read More →
MH

Maria Hwang

Higher Education Institution, Teachers College, Columbia University
Teachers College, Columbia University
ET

Emily Tanner- Smith

Research Assistant Professor, Vanderbilt University


Thursday July 9, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Old Madison

10:30am

Narrative
Stories, Games, & Learning Through Play: An Analysis of Narrative Affordances in Game-Based Instruction
Stephen Slota, Michael Young, Roger Travis

Stories are the mechanism through which humans construct reality and make sense of the world around them. Yet, research on the positive effects of narrative in game-based and other learning environments is quite variable, and the relevance of narrative to the learning sciences is not well understood. Identifying precisely how narrative intertwines with human experience of the lived-in world requires the application of a situated cognition framework to understand recipient-content-context interactions as dynamic and co-determined. To begin unpacking this issue, a narrative-structured, game-based learning program, Project TECHNOLOGIA, was used to target in-context, on-the-fly dialogic interactions between narrative “producers” (i.e., instructors) and “recipients” (i.e., participating students). Results indicate that there may be value in pursuing narrative as an instructional game mechanic for complex social, cultural, and intellectual issues as well as the induction of real-world goal adoption. Recommendations for further research are provided.


“I Have To Tell You Something”: How Narrative and Pretend Play Intersect In Story Games
Sean Duncan, Chris Georgen, Lucas Cook, Joey Huang

In this paper, we explore learning and play within the context of rules-light, narratively-focused tabletop role-playing games, colloquially called “story games.” Focusing on data drawn from The Story Games Project, we highlight exchanges within a game session of the game Fiasco, which illustrate a negotiation of roles and collaborative narrative construction among players. With an emphasis on revoicing and pretend play, we discuss implicit mechanics which guide the enaction of roles within the play of these games, as well as the means by which players learn to embody different identities through play.


Metafiction in Videogames
James Cox

There have been doubts about the existence of metafiction within videogames. It may be related to the paucity of research that grounds metaficiton as a game relevant term. This discourse will briefly define what metafiction is and explore the existence of metafiction within fiction. In doing so, it will separate metafiction in videogames from credits and in-game instructions. A description of four types of metafiction in videogames (emergent metafiction: fiction that reveals itself to the player, immersive: fiction that brings the player into the fiction, internal: character-to-character, and external: designer-to-player) is discussed. Ultimately, the implication of metafiction in videogames is illuminated, and its potential impact on the future of game design summarized.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for James Cox

James Cox

Digital Wizard, Seemingly Pointless
Making 100 games in 5 years. Graduate student in USC's Interactive Media and Games Design program.
avatar for Sean Duncan

Sean Duncan

Assistant Professor, Indiana University
avatar for Joey Huang

Joey Huang

Indiana University, United States of America
I am a doctoral student in Indiana University’s Learning Sciences program. My research interests include affinity spaces, informal learning, and learning through social media. In particular, I am interested in developing creative and innovative learning environments. I recently draw my research interest into a triangle shape with respect to three aspects – computational thinking, constructionism settings/spaces, and cultural variation. As a... Read More →
avatar for Stephen Slota

Stephen Slota

Co-Founder, The Pericles Group, LLC
Steve (@steveslota) is an instructional design specialist and game design scientist at the University of Connecticut Health Center and a co-founder of The Pericles Group, LLC. He holds a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology: Cognition, Instruction, & Learning Technologies and has worked on a variety of game and instructional design projects with organizations including Arizona State University's Center for Games & Impact, Intel Corporation, and... Read More →
avatar for Roger Travis

Roger Travis

Storrs, CT, US, University of Connecticut, and The Pericles Group, LLC
Only connect: ancient epic to video games; teacher to student; gamer to gamer; fan to fan; parent to child; human being to human being.
avatar for Michael Young

Michael Young

UConn
A situated cognitive view of learning on-the-fly in video game environments, through rich narratives, assessed through card play and understood as social participation, with an ecological psychology flare.


Thursday July 9, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Inn Wisconsin

10:30am

Game Your Life: Health, Behavior, and Personal Data Gaming
Game Your Life: Health, Behavior, and Personal Data Gaming
Cynthia Ching, Sara Schaefer, Mary Stewart, Danielle Hagood

This session presents a novel genre of games, personal data gaming, in which players wear digital monitoring devices that collect data about aspects of their everyday lives and behaviors, and then the data become useful in a game context. We describe the genre itself and our game design, applications in a health education context, and results from a multi-year DBR study of personal data gaming with middle school youth, specifically students’ motivations and engagements as well as socio-economic comparisons across field sites.

Speakers
avatar for Cynthia Ching

Cynthia Ching

Associate Professor of Learning and Mind Sciences, University of California, Davis
Technology and identity, personal data gaming, embodied cognition, games and behavior.
avatar for Danielle Hagood

Danielle Hagood

PhD Student, University of California, Davis
SS

Sara Schaefer

University of California, Davis
avatar for Mary Stewart

Mary Stewart

PhD Candidate, University of California, Davis


Thursday July 9, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Class of '24

10:30am

Love Is a Battlefield
Love Is a Battlefield: A Comparative Analysis of Love as a Game Mechanic and SartreÍs Being and Nothingness
Kyrie Eleison H. Caldwell

This piece uses a semiotic textual analysis to discuss love-based mechanics in particular games, namely Fire Emblem: Awakening, Persona 3 and Persona 4, and the Harvest Moon series. These games’ love-based mechanics share an archetypical construction that posits a problematic discourse of love that revokes subjectivity and agency from the (usually non-player) characters who serve as objects of love for the player character. That rhetoric of love is then compared to that of Jean-Paul Sartre in Being and Nothingness in order to explore how these games’ mechanics of love undermine the diversity of games’ narratives and people’s actual experiences of love.

Speakers
avatar for Kyrie Eleison H. Caldwell

Kyrie Eleison H. Caldwell

Graduate Student (Master's), Massachusetts Institute of Technology
I am a master's candidate in Comparative Media Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where I work in the MIT Game Lab and The Education Arcade. My current research interests lie in intersectional representation, gender, and affect in games, and my background is in art history and religious studies.


Thursday July 9, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Play Circle Theater

10:30am

What Do I Do With All This Data?
What Do I Do With All This Data? How to Use the FUN! Tool to Automatically Clean, Analyze, and Visualize Your Digital Data
Kevin Close, Phil Janisiewicz, Sarah Brasiel

Digital learning environments, particularly digital games, are becoming more prevalent and datasets from these environments are becoming larger, but many researchers are still parsing data using spreadsheet software and graduate student labor. The academic community, like the business community, needs tools to automate repetitive processes and to manage the increasing amount of data from these digital learning environments. In this workshop, attendees will learn to use a new tool called the Functional Navigation Tool, or FUN! tool, to adapt, analyze, and present their digital data.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Brasiel

Sarah Brasiel

Senior Researcher, Adjunct Faculty, Utah State University
Associate Director of the Active Learning Lab where I currently lead 3 NSF grant research projects that are coming to a close related to engaging young people in computer programming and also understanding learning in a fraction game environment. I also lead an external evaluation of 5 statewide STEM initiatives including one with over 200,000 students using 11 digital mathematics technology products. Eighteen years of teaching experience as a... Read More →
avatar for Kevin Close

Kevin Close

Graduate Research Assistant, Utah State University
Questions about the FUN! tool? Please reach out. Visit http://activelearninglab.org/ or https://github.com/activelearninglab for more information.


Thursday July 9, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Beefeaters

10:30am

GLS Showcase
An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge
James Cox

Anne and Emmett: The Other

Brian Pelletier, Andrea Kalin

Applying Escape Room Game Concepts to Informal Learning: Escape Fort Stanwix!

Scott Nicholson

Backyard Engineers
Matthew Haselton, Trevor Brown, Brandon Pittser

Bust A Cup: Reclaiming Risk in Play
Brian Schrank, Brian Gabor Jr.

CHL: Dearth of Darkness
Dana Klisanin

Choice: Texas
Carly Kocurek, Allyson Whipple

Czechoslovakia 38-89: Assassination
Tereza Slembacherova, Vit Sisler, Cyril Brom, Jakub Gemrot, Jaroslav Cuhra

EMPIRES: Trade Goats, Grow Grain, Master your Empire.  And Pre-Algebra
J. Scott Laidlaw, Martha Riecks

Ending the Cycle: An Educational Board Game On Abuse
Peter Wonica

Fujian Trader
Sari Gilbert

Lock Down: A Deck-Building Concurrency Game
Jazmyn Russell, Matthew Berland

Nyingi: A Multiplication Game
André Denham

Spaceteam ESL
David Waddington

Splattershmup: A Game of Art & Motion
Andrew Phelps

Stagecraft: Promoting Language Learning Through Play
Jen Helms, Justin Helms

The Design and Development of an Educational Game for Upper-Elementary School Children: Down with Food
Chantal Fry, Martha Han, Ohoud Alharbi, Qi Shi, Iris Zeng

The World the Children Made
James Cox

TimeString: Design and Philosophy
William Jordan-Cooley, Yoon-Ji Kim

Touching Triton
Kelly East, Adam Hott, Neil Lamb

Troubled Lands
Tom Fennewald

Twelve a Dozen
Justin Leites, Alan Dang



Moderators
avatar for Dennis Ramirez

Dennis Ramirez

Technical Director, USC IMGD, Videogame Researcher

Speakers
MB

Matthew Berland

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
avatar for Trevor Brown

Trevor Brown

Art Director, Filament Games
Trevor specializes in interaction design at Filament Games. He relishes the many challenges involved in the creation of learning games, from designing intuitive interfaces to crafting attractive, audience-appropriate graphics. Trevor particularly enjoys using his career as an excuse to purchase and play countless intriguing games spanning every mechanic and subject matter imaginable. He feels extraordinarily fortunate to be a game developer... Read More →
avatar for James Cox

James Cox

Digital Wizard, Seemingly Pointless
Making 100 games in 5 years. Graduate student in USC's Interactive Media and Games Design program.
avatar for André Denham

André Denham

Assistant Professor of Instructional Technology, The University of Alabama
avatar for Kelly East

Kelly East

Genetic Counselor, HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology
MH

Matthew Haselton

Game Designer and Research Assistant, Filament Games
avatar for Jen Helms

Jen Helms

Co-Founder, Playmation Studios
Jen is a co-founder at Playmation Studios, making games for people to play and learn about language in novel ways. Jen used to teach through real-world games and immersive play in Yosemite National park.
avatar for Adam Hott

Adam Hott

Digital Applications Lead, HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology
avatar for William Jordan-Cooley

William Jordan-Cooley

Instructional Designer, BrainPOP
Will is an Instructional Designer specializing in educational games. At BrainPOP, Will works on GameUp, a curated collection of over 100 educational games with K12 alignments and teacher support materials. | | Will obtained his M.A. in Instructional Technology and Media from Columbia University Teachers College, where he collaborated with Dr. Joey Lee, the Eggplant Games Lab and the NSF-funded POLAR research group on a variety of games... Read More →
avatar for Dana Klisanin

Dana Klisanin

Founder/Designer, Evolutionary Guidance Media R&D
I'm a psychologist & systems scientist that took up game design to activate Cyberhero League, a 21st century scout-like adventure that enables kids of all ages to tackle global challenge. Through "parterning for the goals" gamers set out to achieve the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) & take on a host of Defilers. I'm passionate about using the digital Web to support the Web of Life and to spread human values, such as... Read More →
CK

Carly Kocurek

Illinois Institute of Technology
avatar for Scott Laidlaw

Scott Laidlaw

CEO, MidSchoolMath
Scott Laidlaw is a math teacher-turned-game designer. With 14 years of in-classroom teaching experience at the elementary, secondary and university levels, since earning his doctoral degree from the University of Northern Colorado, Scott has focused his research and development on how students learn mathematics through the imagination. Scott began teaching math at a middle school where fewer than 28% of his students were proficient in math... Read More →
avatar for Scott Nicholson

Scott Nicholson

Associate Professor, Syracuse University School of Information Studies
Dr. Scott Nicholson is an Associate Professor at Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies and the Director of the Because Play Matters game lab. His areas of interest include meaningful gamification and the creation of transformative games for informal learning and training through participatory design. Dr. Nicholson is a published board game designer, wrote the book Everyone Plays at the Library, and was the host of the Web video... Read More →
avatar for Brian Pelletier

Brian Pelletier

Creative Director & Head of Development, Games Learning Society Center & Learning Games Network
I'm a professional artist and appreciate the comic book art form for storytelling. I have been developing video games for 21 years. I love creating story through art and games provided me the opportunity to bring artwork to life in an interactive story. After developing and shipping 16 AAA retail games that my kids could not play I became passionate about creating games for them that would be fun and meaningful. I'm able to follow that passion... Read More →
avatar for Brandon Pittser

Brandon Pittser

Marketing Director, Filament Games
As Marketing Director at Filament Games, Brandon applies his passion for games and learning to their content marketing practice and overall marketing strategy. He thrives on creating and sustaining a meaningful conversation with educators and developers about game-based learning, all while pursuing partnerships that will expand the reach and adoption of learning games. Aside from marketing direction and content generation, his role at Filament... Read More →
avatar for Martha Riecks

Martha Riecks

Director of Outreach/Director, National Conference, MidSchoolMath
Martha has spent over a decade in the nonprofit sector, developing a strong background in environmental outreach, experiential education and STEM programming for girls, in diverse roles within a range of organizations. She holds a Masters Degree in organizational management, with experience in outcomes-based program development and evaluation. Martha endeavors to leverage innovative pedagogy to transform how students, and society, comprehend math... Read More →
avatar for Jazmyn Russell

Jazmyn Russell

Itamae, Air Nation


Thursday July 9, 2015 10:30am - 3:30pm
Great Hall

11:30am

Coffee Break & Snack
Thursday July 9, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Great Hall

12:00pm

White House Pillow Talk
White House Pillow Talk
Mark DeLoura, Constance Steinkuehler

Working in the White House is a unique experience that affords many lessons – in politics and bureaucracy of course, but also in technology innovation and its role in the national policy conversation, building partnerships on someone else’s budget, the roles of broadcasting and convening in moving agendas along, and where to find a good sandwich late night on Pennsylvania Avenue. Working as the so-called national “fun czar,” however, is singular indeed. Viewing the overall landscape or ecosystem of games for impact at the national level from the White House point of view yields a person real insight into who the major players are, what their value propositions happen to be, what missed opportunities lie hidden still waiting to be exploited, and where the barriers and frictions within the ecosystem lie. This fireside chat will be a post-mortem discussion between Constance Steinkuehler and Mark DeLoura, two former senior policy analysts in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy who were hired to advise on games for impact at the national level, on the state of play in games for learning and society. We will candidly discuss our individual and shared insights into this growing sector in plain terms, getting beyond the hype, hoopla, and talking points.


Speakers
avatar for Mark DeLoura

Mark DeLoura

Former White House
Games for education, computer science literacy, White House adventures, game technology. Green tea.


Thursday July 9, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Capitol View

12:00pm

Zoombinis: The Return of the Logical Journey
Zoombinis: The Return of the Logical Journey
Jodi Asbell-Clarke, Scot Osterweil, Elizabeth Rowe

The Logical Journey of the Zoombinis (hereafter Zoombinis) was the first in a series of three computational thinking games and is still what some consider the first and, arguably, one of the best educational games to date (Davidson, 2014). Today, TERC and partners—FableVision Studios, Learning Games Network and The Game Agency—are re-launching Zoombinis for wireless devices (e.g., tablets) to a large commercial audience ranging from ages eight through adult. The re-launch has many considerations for design and research to leverage the nostalgia audience, to reach a new generation, and to understand the power of the game for learning sciences.

Speakers
avatar for Jodi Asbell-Clarke

Jodi Asbell-Clarke

Director, TERC
I direct a team of game designers, researchers, and learning scientists who live and work on the edge of science and play.
avatar for Scot Osterweil

Scot Osterweil

Scot Osterweil is Creative Director of the Education Arcade in the MIT Comparative Media Studies Program. He has designed award-winning games in both academic and commercial environments, focusing on what is authentically playful in challenging academic subjects. Designs include the acclaimed Zoombinis series (math and logic), Vanished: The MIT/Smithsonian Curated Game(environmental science), Labyrinth (math), Kids Survey Network (data and... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Rowe

Elizabeth Rowe

Director of Research, EdGE @ TERC


Thursday July 9, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Main Lounge

12:00pm

Engaging Teachers
Playful District Level Professional Learning for In-Practice Teachers
Seann Dikkers, Ryan Reider, Jody Monk, Krisanna Machtmes, John Gregory, Ding Mao, Trina Barrell, Linda Fife

Costly national development efforts to use technology to build professional development (PD) efforts have relied on grant funding and a top-down, compulsory, framework for adult learning, yet traditional collective teacher PD has limited, if any, predictable classroom appropriation rates for classroom practices. Current research of exemplary teachers, however, suggests that transformative teacher practice, actually emerges from informal, relational, and differentiated professional learning (PL), not one-size-fits-all PD.

We apply this theoretical framework to a one year PL program, in cooperation with a mid-sized rural school district. We report the design justification for: 1) ‘Just-in-time’ training/support services; 2) an intentional-informal communities of practice; 3) teacher prompted mini-workshops; 4) an online web resource; and 5) data-driven PL evaluation. Mixed method findings indicate PL is significantly more effective at teacher appropriation of ideas, positive teacher efficacy, and is scalable within existing resources and budgets.


Supporting Non-Game Designers: Developing a Course to Support Teachers in Game-based Learning and Game Design & Developing a Community of Practice
Michelle Aubrecht, Bob De Schutter, Andrew Wheatley, David Clark

One of the authors designed and taught a course intended to provide a theoretical understanding of games and game-making in the classroom with practical applications. A student from the course will share his perspective. This presentation will explain this unique course design and approach to teaching teachers and share the results of the formative assessments. The course design included a combination of gamification, badging, peer review, and building one’s own course by having assignment options.


Exploring Board Games and Literacy in Preschool, Kindergarten and First Grade Classrooms
Katherine Sydik

Foundational literacy skills are highly important to future academic success, as language skill gaps tend to increase with time. Affordances of table games for literacy in early childhood classrooms have not yet been adequately studied. The purpose of this study is to seek insights from early childhood educators about experiences with games in the classroom. Interviews were conducted with preschool through first grade teachers. This lead to the themes: Builds Good Social Skills, They Keep Repeating It and Its Not Boring, Intentional Teaching, They Think – Oh! It’s Fun!, We Don’t Get to Use Games Like We Used To, and All They Know of a Game is a Handheld Video Game. This study demonstrates importance of games in early child education and concerns to monitor. Exploratory qualitative research also provides feedback for developing and evaluating table game interventions with benefits for early childhood educators, curriculum developers, and table game enthusiasts.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Michelle Aubrecht

Michelle Aubrecht

game based learning specialist, Ohio State University
Michelle is the coordinator for the Earthworks Rising project which is an interactive learning environment that draws upon her partner, Dr. Ballengee-Morris’ deep understanding of Native Pedagogy and the earthworks which are ancient earthen structures. Michelle brings her knowledge of software, games, game-making, social media, art, and history to this project. Together they have been building this project and doing research. In addition... Read More →
avatar for David Clark

David Clark

Curriculum and Technology Specialist, Butler County ESC
avatar for Seann Dikkers

Seann Dikkers

Education Department Chair, Bethel University
Seann Dikkers is an associate professor of Education at Bethel University. Formerly, Seann served fourteen years as a middle school teacher, high school principal, and researcher. Now he teaches, writes, and works with some amazing colleagues at Bethel. He studies exemplary teaching, learning design, and learning systems. His books include *Real-Time Research*, *Mobile Media Learning I and II*, and *TeacherCraft: Minecraft in the Classroom... Read More →
avatar for Bob De Schutter

Bob De Schutter

Oxford, Ohio, United States, Miami University
I'm a designer, researcher and teacher. My research interests are game design, the older audience of digital games, and the use of games for non-entertainment purposes.
avatar for Katherine Sydik

Katherine Sydik

Graduate Student, University of Nebraska-Lincoln


Thursday July 9, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Old Madison

12:00pm

Games for Insight & Innovation
TASK - A Transformational Videogame
Roberto Razo Rodríguez

Design students needs to learn ethnographic skills for user centered design. We want them to learn realize that in an interview there are different kinds of questions that can lead to different kind of responses. To do this we are designing a video game to allow a situated learning experience through the dynamics between: people, content and context. In this game the following concepts are being applying: Transformational Play (Barab, 2010), Player Experience Need of Satisfaction (Rigby & Ryan, 2011) and the 36 learning principles of learning (Gee, 2003).


Mind of an Innovator
Justin Lee, Bryan Kujawski

Imagine there was a game being played in your organization. Everyone was a player, and the game was integrated into your daily work. In order to succeed in the game, you needed to pay attention to specific things other players said or did. And when they did or said these things, your goal was to be the first to recognize them with a tangible item, a token. Success in this game happens when you receive a high amount of recognition tokens, and when you give a high amount of recognition tokens. In our Mind of an Innovator game, the behaviors promote divergent thinking.


Problematizing Games and Learning: The Ideal Trajectory and Cultural Ideologies
Hong-An Wu

In this presentation, I will problematize the celebratory claims about the educational value of learning through vide game cultures by examining critiques from critical digital studies and critical cultural studies. The first problem with the claims made about learning through video game cultures is that it assumes an ideal trajectory towards video game participation. The second problem with the claims made about learning through video game cultures is that they do not address explicitly the embedded cultural hegemony that students are also learning. By bringing these concerns into the discourse and proposing possible alternative approaches, this presentation aims to engage with this medium from a critical position in this emerging field of games and learning.

Moderators
avatar for Owen Gottlieb

Owen Gottlieb

Assistant Professor, Interactive Games and Media, RIT
Owen Gottlieb, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor of Interactive Games and Media at RIT. He is the the founder and lead researcher at the Initiative in Religion, Culture, and Policy at the RIT Center for Media, Arts, Games, Interaction, and Creativity (MAGIC) magic.rit.edu/rcp Jewish Time Jump: NY his mobile augmented reality history game (developed at ConverJent (www.converjent.org) was nominated for Most Innovative Game by the Games for Change... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Justin Lee

Justin Lee

Lead Media Designer, Capella University
Justin is the Lead Media Designer at Capella University, where he partners with academic leadership, acting as a conduit and advocate for engaging, innovative and effective media ideation and direction. Due to his curiosity and love of solving problems, he has successfully performed in many roles during his fifteen-years in the industry. Justin has extensive experience in graphic and interactive design, user experience, branding and identity... Read More →
avatar for Roberto Razo Rodríguez

Roberto Razo Rodríguez

Universidad Iberoamericana Puebla


Thursday July 9, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Inn Wisconsin

12:00pm

Learning With Games: Experiences From a Norwegian Upper-secondary School
Learning With Games: Experiences From a Norwegian Upper-secondary School
Rune Klevjer, Tobias Staaby, Aleksander Husøy

In this symposium paper, we report our experience with using off-the-shelf video games at a Norwegian upper-secondary school over the last 3-4 years. A broad range of game-centred teaching units have been tried out, by ourselves and others, across 5 different subjects and totalling roughly 200 classroom hours. We reflect on what we have learned so far, discuss some key strategies and guiding principles, and also present some preliminary findings from a recent classroom study.

Speakers
avatar for Aleksander Husøy

Aleksander Husøy

Lærer og spillpedagog, Nordahl Grieg vgs.
Aleksander Husøy jobber på Nordahl Grieg vgs. som lærer og spillpedagog, og har erfaringer i klasserommet med spill som Civilization IV, Gone Home, Elegy for a Dead World m.fl. Han blogger sammen med kollega Tobias Staaby og kollega Vegard Relling.
avatar for Tobias Staaby

Tobias Staaby

Lærer og spillpedagog, Nordahl Grieg vgs.
Tobias Staaby jobber på Nordahl Grieg vgs. som lærer og spillpedagog, og er internasjonalt kjent for å ha brukt zombie-eventyrspillet The Walking Dead i etikkundervisning. Han lar også elever spille The Last of Us, Skyrim, Journey m.fl. i ulike fag og tverrfaglige opplegg.


Thursday July 9, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Class of '24

12:00pm

Ingress Well-Played: City as MMO
Ingress Well-Played: City as MMO
Elizabeth Lawley

Ingress, a geo-local, mobile augmented reality game created by Niantic Labs at Google, incorporates aspects of pervasive, alternate reality (ARG) and massively multiplayer online (MMO) games. However, unlike the majority of successful ARGs and pervasive games, Ingress is not focused on a specific time- limited period, or linked to a single real-world event or location. And unlike a typical MMO, play in Ingress is geo-spatially limited; players must be physically proximate to game elements in order to interact with them. Using game mechanics similar to those of many MMOs, Ingress provides for a range of gameplay, based both on user play preferences and level of experience and achievement. This paper describes both the new player and the “end game” player experience, with a focus on the importance of social, community, and collaborative aspects of the game.

Participants are encouraged to install the Ingress software on their phones so that they can participate in a live play session in and around the conference venue.

Speakers
avatar for Liz Lawley

Liz Lawley

Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology


Thursday July 9, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Play Circle Theater

12:00pm

The Composition Box: From Collaborative Ideation to Exploratory Playtesting
The Composition Box: From Collaborative Ideation to Exploratory Playtesting
Judeth Oden Choi, Jodi Forlizzi, Jessica Hammer, Michael Christel, MacKenzie Bates

Working with a diverse team to create an experience as complex as a game is challenging. So often the most difficult part is moving from the ideation phase to the creation of a prototype that addresses the needs and embodies the ideas of all involved. Together we will engage in a process that will help us refine our game’s goals, consider how the game’s “ingredients” work to fulfill those goals, and use bodystorming to generate multiple sketches, or “compositions,” of our game experience. Adapted from Anne Bogart’s approach to composition for the stage (Eckard, 2006), our compositions will help us move toward building a prototype and generating testable questions about the effective execution of our game’s goals and the player’s experience.


Thursday July 9, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Beefeaters

1:00pm

Lunch and Rant
James Paul Gee will give a talk titled Waiting for Manny during the lunch-time session.

Speakers

Thursday July 9, 2015 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Great Hall

2:30pm

The Guild Decided Something Stupid, and It Isn’t OK
The Guild Decided Something Stupid, and It Isn’t OK
Constance Steinkuehler, Andrew Phelphs

At the very first (or was it the second?) GLS, two young assistant professors hung out and swapped stories about leading guilds in MMORPGs, and the lessons and experiments that might translate to academic politics, tenure cases, and random bits of academia, chief among them the role of emerging and established leadership in situations that are at once both democratic and executive.  When does the guild leader accept the counsel of their senior members? When do they act to appease a particular consistency (the tank, the healers, the @)#($*) quest-monkeys?)  The democratic vote of all their members?  When do they throw it all aside and exercise executive power?  And when/why/how do they know the difference?  And what does this teach us – what do these training grounds mean?  How are they useful?  And if those same professors were to be told that GLS firesides weren’t a ‘thing’ anymore, given the voice of the membership, what would they do?  Join Constance and Andy as they reflect on a decade of running guilds, programs, centers, departments, and organizations, and the nuanced balancing act of trying to figure out when to listen, where to bend, how to act, and the intricate dance of leadership.  Plus, there will be a fire.


Thursday July 9, 2015 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Capitol View

2:30pm

Game Design in Higher Education
Attack of the Campus ARGs!
David Leach

My attempt to create a "self-organized learning environment" (SOLE) nearly became a "self-organized learning disaster" (SOLD) when I asked university undergraduate students to create teams, do self-directed research and produce ARGs—augmented reality games or alternative reality guides—that imagined how technological trends might transform the campus of the future. The ups and downs of our experiment in allowing students to create quest-driven, geolocative smartphone games highlighted the challenges of combining research and game making as a learning exercise.


Creating a Customizable Alternate Reality Game Toolkit for Academic Libraries
Scott Nicholson, Angela Ramnarine-Rieks, Alexandra Heidler, Sarah Bratt

This article documents the process of creating and testing a prototype of a customizable Alternate Reality Game (ARG) toolkit for academic libraries. The goal of the project was to create an information literacy game toolkit for academic libraries that was more engaging and relevant to users than a traditional fact-based scavenger hunt. The researchers started with a Delphi study with librarians to develop a set of functional and technical requirements and then developed a story and prototype to meet those requirements. They then performed limited testing of the prototype and documented lessons learned about making games for libraries.


Second Life Ghost Towns: Questioning Discourses of Learning Artifacts in Higher Education
Sheruni Ratnabalasuriar, Timothy Rowlands

Second Life presented new opportunities for curriculum innovation in higher education. At its peak, over 171 colleges and universities from around the world were using this online virtual world as a cost-effective way to create customizable, media-rich environments for distance and online education. However, the use of Second Life by colleges and universities in the United States began to drop significantly, particularly as initial studies and evaluations of learning outcomes and experiences produced mixed results (Inman, Wright & Hartman, 2010). Steep learning curves, connection issues, social disruptions, and other barriers emerged that began to temper the initial enthusiasm for the learning platform. This paper uses the frameworks of Dwayne Hubner (2000) and Karen Ferneding (2004) to further theorize the possibilities and limitations of the space. By limiting themselves to technical and political language frameworks, educational users of Second Life often missed out on the rich possibilities of this virtual world.

Moderators
avatar for Beth King

Beth King

Assistant Professor, Educational Foundations, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater

Speakers
avatar for Alexandra Heidler

Alexandra Heidler

Student, Syracuse University
ARGs, games and learning, narrative and story telling. Also a lover of teas, books, and libraries.
avatar for David Leach

David Leach

Chair, Department of Writing; Director, Technology & Society Minor, University of Victoria
Interested in gamification, digital publishing & journalism, augmented reality, simulation games, creative nonfiction, hyper-literature and other interactive media. Director of the Interdisciplinary Minor in Technology & Society at the University of Victoria.
avatar for Scott Nicholson

Scott Nicholson

Associate Professor, Syracuse University School of Information Studies
Dr. Scott Nicholson is an Associate Professor at Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies and the Director of the Because Play Matters game lab. His areas of interest include meaningful gamification and the creation of transformative games for informal learning and training through participatory design. Dr. Nicholson is a published board game designer, wrote the book Everyone Plays at the Library, and was the host of the Web video... Read More →
avatar for Angela Ramnarine-Rieks

Angela Ramnarine-Rieks

Postdoctoral Researcher, Syracuse University
My research focuses on the use of game design to promote intrinsic motivation, higher order learning and transfer of learned skills.
avatar for Sheruni Ratnabalasuriar

Sheruni Ratnabalasuriar

Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice, Saginaw Valley State University
My research and teaching explores interactions around social justice, higher education curricula, social inequalities, and intersectional identities. I'm also an avid Minecrafter and fan of most things geek-ish.
avatar for Tim Rowlands

Tim Rowlands

Assistant Professor, Saginaw Valley State University
I am an assistant professor and game research with interests in issues of representation, violence, community and social justice within video games. | | I also teach a class called "Crime & Video Games" in a gamified format in which the final project has undergraduate criminal justice students creating pro-social ARGs to raise awareness about crime and safety on campus.


Thursday July 9, 2015 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Inn Wisconsin

2:30pm

Rethinking STEM
A Novel Interactive Paradigm for Teaching Quantum Mechanics
Mithila Tople, Rose Peng, William Dorn, Azad Naeemi, Nassim Jafarinaimi

Quantum Mechanics (QM) is the foundation for science and engineering disciplines as diverse as physics, materials science, chemistry, and nanotechnology. However, educators face major challenges in teaching QM concepts to students given the abstract and non-experiential nature of QM. To address the above challenges we are creating a virtual environment governed by the laws of quantum mechanics as a way to engage alternative ways of teaching and learning QM.

In our current prototype, the students begin in a classical world that is governed by laws found in our everyday experiences. Here, they encounter potential and kinetic energies, the conservation of energy, the predictability of position, and the continuous nature of energies allowed. They later move into a nanoscale environment in which energies are quantized, electrons can tunnel through potential barriers, and only probabilities are known. The juxtaposition of these two worlds enables students to compare classical and quantum mechanics.


Shooting for Equality: From Stereotype Threat in Games to Gender Disparity in STEM
Rabindra Ratan, Joseph Fordham, Kuo-Ting Huang, Corrie Strayer

The connection between video games and STEM interest has become a key focus for education and game scholars alike. While games have the potential to bring more girls and women into STEM fields, gender stereotypes about gaming ability potentially prevent this outcome. To examine this issue, the present study investigates the effect of stereotype threat induced in a gaming context on female video game players’ perception of STEM fields. A 2 (article type: stereotype threat or non-threatening) x 2 (gender of opponent: male or female) experiment found that stereotype threat induced in the game context increased participants’ ratings of STEM fields as better suited for men than women. These results suggest that one approach to increasing the representation of women in STEM fields is for our society to promote gender equality in video games.


Disciplinarily-Integrated Games: A Generalizable Genre?
Douglas Clark, Sat Virk, Pratim Sengupta

Disciplinary integration can be thought of in terms of Collins and colleagues’ analyses of model types (epistemic forms) and modeling strategies (epistemic games). More specifically, the puzzles and game-play mechanics of disciplinarily-integrated games distill modeling strategies for navigating and manipulating model types. Framing disciplinary integration in terms of model types and modeling strategies opens a vast trove of epistemic forms and epistemic games that span across disciplines (in fact well beyond STEM into the social sciences). To explore the generalizability of disciplinary integration to games, the following sections propose other hypothetical examples in physics, biology, chemistry, and the social sciences. We discuss this generalizability in terms of its economic, curricular, and developmental implications.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Douglas Clark

Douglas Clark

Vanderbilt University
www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jaznkUOW6E | chais 2013 talk (1 hour) | | http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlMfk5rP9yI&feature=youtu.be | cyberlearning summit 2012 talk (10 minutes) | | Doug Clark's research investigates the learning processes through which people come to understand core science concepts. This work focuses primarily on conceptual change, explanation, collaboration, and argumentation. Clark's research often explores these... Read More →
RR

Rabindra Ratan

East Lansing, MI, United States, Michigan State University


Thursday July 9, 2015 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Old Madison

2:30pm

I Choose You! Diversity in the Design of Pokémon
I Choose You! Diversity in the Design of Pokémon
Jenny Saucerman, Amanda Ochsner

In this piece, we argue that the Pokémon series serves as an example of how game developers can make design for inclusive for player communication systems, diverse character representations, and player experiences without alienating their core gamer fan bases. We choose to focus and elaborate on three particular features of the Pokémon series in this article. First, we describe the rigid structure for how players are able to communicate with one another and how this structure prevents player harassment. Second, we argue that Pokémon has allowed for increased customization of characters as the series has progressed, but it remains a minimal feature that players can customize—or not—as they play. Finally, we argue that the Pokémon series supports a variety of ways to approach gameplay without ghettoizing any one approach. We explore these design features in greater detail and make recommendations for other game designers.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Ochsner

Amanda Ochsner

Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Southern California
avatar for Jenny Saucerman

Jenny Saucerman

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison


Thursday July 9, 2015 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Play Circle Theater

2:30pm

Landscape & Geography
Evaluating Geography as Game Aesthetics for Engagement
Diali Gupta, Beaumie Kim

There has been a growing interest over aesthetics in games for motivation and engagement of learners. We have previously argued how game aesthetics stimulate learners’ critical thinking skills and proposed that aesthetics be considered for evaluation of digital games. Building further upon the notion we dwell on geography as an aesthetical element of games. Analyzing three distinctive games (a digital game, a board game and a game-based learning environment), we illustrate how geography of a game may reveal the core learning concepts and provide complexities for deeper engagement. It is often difficult for teachers to assess the aesthetic values of games that are not content specific. Our working example offers ways to establish and analyze the pedagogy. Using three different examples we elucidate how the social, cultural and physical landscapes of a game provide a socio-cultural context for the learners to understand the content or subject presented through the game.


Space for Making...Games and Landscape
Christopher Marlow

Exploring the Use of a Location-Based iPad Augmented Reality Game for Elementary History Education
Julie Oltman, Thomas Hammond

This study explored the design and use of an augmented reality, location-based, iPad game, created with the ARIS platform, to enhance the learning experience of young elementary history students. Specifically, this study measured students’ flow rates, learning outcomes, and attitudes along with teacher opinions. Data sources included observation, teacher and student interviews, class debrief sessions, teacher-created assessment tools, and surveys.

Moderators
avatar for David Gagnon

David Gagnon

Director, Field Day Lab, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I have a sweet spot for directing small design teams to approach big challenges. I like thinking and making real world products that are inspired by all the cool stuff kids like these days. I love seeing other people find themselves by making something new. I also am a bit of a baking addict, still trying to nail the traditional sour dough baguette in a wood fired oven.

Speakers
DG

Diali Gupta

Calgary, Alberta, Canada, University of Calgary
BK

Beaumie Kim

Associate Professor, University of Calgary
Beaumie Kim is an associate professor and chair of the Learning Sciences at the Werklund School of Education. She worked previously at the Learning Sciences Group in Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, as well as NASA-sponsored Classroom of the Future program in Wheeling Jesuit University. Her research is focused on students' constructing their own understanding using gaming, modeling and visualization tools for learning. Her work is... Read More →
avatar for Julie Oltman

Julie Oltman

Doctoral Student, Lehigh University
Julie Oltman is a PhD candidate in the Teaching, Learning, & Technology program at Lehigh University. She has an M.S. degree in Kinesiology and B.A. degree in English, both from the University of New Hampshire. In addition to her doctoral studies, she works as the Assistant Athletic Director for Technology at Lehigh University. Her research interests include digital mobile learning, game-based learning, and elementary social studies education.


Thursday July 9, 2015 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Class of '24

2:30pm

Designing and Developing Online Games with Gameblox
Designing and Developing Online Games with Gameblox
Paul Medlock-Walton, Eric Klopfer

This proposed workshop will introduce participants to Gameblox, a blocks-based programming environment that allows users to create web based 2d games. After following a guided tutorial, and learning from sample games, participants will be able to make their own games and share them online. This proposal describes the features and benefits of Gameblox in addition to the workshop activities.


Thursday July 9, 2015 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Beefeaters

3:30pm

Coffee Break & Snack
Thursday July 9, 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Great Hall

4:00pm

Personalization in Practice: Strategies For How Schools Work With Students to Design Customized Learning Pathways
Personalization in Practice: Strategies For How Schools Work With Students to Design Customized Learning Pathways
Rich Halverson

School across the country are experimenting with new media and data technologies to customize learning experiences for and with students in traditional schools. Rich Halverson will lead a discussion that will highlight recent advances in personalization, such as student production and representation as assessment, the role of learning management systems, and how teachers and students act as learning designers. It would be great if you can come with your best ideas of how to use digital media to transform teaching and learning in traditional schools at scale!

Speakers

Thursday July 9, 2015 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Capitol View

4:00pm

Agency & Control
Play-making: Games and the Quest for Agency
Bob Coulter

This paper argues that game play and the design of games offers a window into youth agency (defined as the use of competence, strategy, and awareness). Analysis of game experiences in light of classical (Aristotelian) and progressive (Deweyan) learning goals illuminates design principles that support the development of agency in contexts beyond games. A key factor is the role of making that occurs within games but is often absent in other learning environments. A 3-part model articulates aspects of making that occur within game spaces: (1) creation of original games or modifications of existing games, (2) construction of transient artifacts used within game play, and (3) development, application, and modification of tacit mini-theories which guide play. Each of these ‘making’ processes allows kids to exercise agency, and thus be active participants in the game space — an identity well worth nurturing other parts of kids’ lives.


Customization and Perceived Choice in an Extended MMO Study
Selen Turkay

As famous game designer Sid Meier said, a game is a series of interesting choices (Rollings & Morris 2000, p. 38). Understanding the role and effect of choices, is critical to effective game design and, quite likely, to learning. With this in mind, the overarching question asked was: Do the effects of customization, defined as a series of choices, change players’ experiences over time? A mixed method study was designed with two conditions: customization (n=33) and no customization (n=33). Adult participants played Lord of the Rings Online (Lotro), a Massively Multiplayer Online game (MMO), for about ten hours over four sessions. Data was collected through surveys, interviews and observations and analyzed. Results showed that all players thought they had more choices over the first three sessions. Participants’ perceived choice was significantly positively correlated with their sense of control in each session.


Playing to Survive, Surviving to Play: The Role of Games in Dystopian Young Adult Literature
Don Latham, Jonathan Hollister

Dystopian young adult literature has become wildly popular over the past decade, and, interestingly, many of these novels employ games and gaming elements as major plot devices. Analysis of these books reveals a close connection between play and power. Using Trites’ analysis of power relations in young adult literature and Rigby and Ryan’s characteristics of engaging games as frameworks, we show that in four recent dystopian novels both protagonists and readers (albeit vicariously) build competency, exert autonomy, and relate to others as they learn to beat the game and negotiate the power dynamics of the dystopian systems they are in, whether real or virtual.

Moderators
avatar for Gay Ivey

Gay Ivey

Gay Ivey is the Tashia F. Morgridge Professor of Reading Education in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Speakers
avatar for Bob Coulter

Bob Coulter

Director, Litzsinger Road Ecology Center (Missouri Botanical Garden)
I spend most of my time thinking about ways to get kids excited about learning and taking action in the community. A good part of this involves games they design with MIT's Taleblazer and StarLogo Nova tools, or in playing Equations, a really cool math game.
avatar for Jonathan Hollister

Jonathan Hollister

Doctoral Candidate, Florida State University
avatar for Don Latham

Don Latham

Professor, Florida State University
Information literacy, digital literacies, youth services, young adult literature
avatar for Selen Turkay

Selen Turkay

Harvard University


Thursday July 9, 2015 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Inn Wisconsin

4:00pm

Games & Workplace Skills
Learning for Doing: Designing Instructional Games for the Workplace
Ethan Valentine

While learning games have received a large amount of attention and research in the last few years, there is still a large gap with regard to workplace learning. Very little literature is available that aims to develop a set of design principles specific to a learning setting that differs significantly from traditional classrooms. Therefore, the goal of this work is to elicit discussion on the design of game-based learning for the workplace, as well to encourage research in this crucial, but often forgotten, learning setting. In this paper I first consider these differences and examine the joint media engagement (JME) framework as it applies to the workplace. I then examine existing literature on game design and use in the workplace. Based on this literature, I propose a set of design principles for workplace-based instructional games based on the joint media engagement (JME) framework.


The Evolution of Scenario-based Learning
Justin Lee, Estelle Domingos

Being an online university, we, the Course Media team at Capella University, have a unique opportunity to integrate interactivity into our courses for adult learners. We create games and other interactive media that simulate authentic real-world professional experiences. Since 2010, we have created four game-like, scenario-based learning products, honing our approach with each iteration, all the while gaining valuable insights. It has not been an easy road traveled, and it is these lessons-learned, process improvements, and efficiencies that we would like to share. And we are not done creating these types of products for the foreseeable future, so we welcome discussion and suggestions towards creating a better, more effective product in a more efficient way.

Fair Play [Title TBD]
Dennis Ramirez, Kurt Squire

Moderators
avatar for Beth King

Beth King

Assistant Professor, Educational Foundations, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater

Speakers
avatar for Estelle Domingos

Estelle Domingos

Lead Media Designer, Capella University
avatar for Justin Lee

Justin Lee

Lead Media Designer, Capella University
Justin is the Lead Media Designer at Capella University, where he partners with academic leadership, acting as a conduit and advocate for engaging, innovative and effective media ideation and direction. Due to his curiosity and love of solving problems, he has successfully performed in many roles during his fifteen-years in the industry. Justin has extensive experience in graphic and interactive design, user experience, branding and identity... Read More →
EV

Ethan Valentine

Iowa City, Iowa, United States, University of Iowa


Thursday July 9, 2015 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Old Madison

4:00pm

The Game Believes in You (Author Reading)
The Game Believes in You (Author Reading)
Greg Toppo

Speakers


Thursday July 9, 2015 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Main Lounge

4:00pm

Any% No Sketch Glitch: Speedrunning the Unwell Play of Final Fantasy VI
Any% No Sketch Glitch: Speedrunning the Unwell Play of Final Fantasy VI
Lucas Cook, Sean Duncan

This paper seeks to look at a form of “unwell play” where a community gathers around a game and redefines the goals of the game for themselves in competition. Focusing specifically on Final Fantasy VI (FFVI), we can see that the practice of speedrunning reflects deep gaming literacies, the commitment to community goals and norms, and the creation of new games out of the elements of existing ones. Speedrunning FFVI reflects redefinitions of the boundaries of what we consider the games we put under study, as well as the role of “well play” in our understanding of them.

Speakers
avatar for Sean Duncan

Sean Duncan

Assistant Professor, Indiana University


Thursday July 9, 2015 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Play Circle Theater

4:00pm

Collaborative Content Generation
Phylo: A Crowdsourced Biodiversity & Science Trading Card Game
David Ng

Phylo (http://phylogame.org) is an exercise in crowd sourcing, open access, and open game development to create a trading card game (TCG) that makes use of the wonderful, complex, and inspiring things that inform the notion of biodiversity. Beginning as a reaction to the following nugget of information: “Kids know more about Pokemon creatures than they do about real creatures,” this project has grown to broach elements of game based science education, ecological literacy, and hackathon mechanics within the teaching community. Given its flexible and open workflow, Phylo has benefited from the input of many communities of expertise, and many collaborations (both formal and spontaneous) leading to a continually expanding resource that is under constant reiteration.


Teaching Bad Apples
Anthony Betrus, Nate Turcotte, Matt Leifeld

Teaching Bad Apples is a game developed in 2014 for current and future teachers. It plays much like Apples to Apples or Cards against Humanity, with each player in turn reading a situation card, followed by the other players choosing their response cards. Each situation, however dramatic or bizarre, is authentic, obtained through crowd-sourcing, social media, and online teacher forums. After many play tests, including feedback from practicing teachers and teacher educators, we concluded that the most effective way to teach people to deal with these dicey situations is to have players provide wildly inappropriate responses to the authentic situations, and then in the debriefing talk about "what you would really do." Effectively the game teaches by counterexample, and by making light of these situations it breaks down conversation barriers, and then gets into authentic and appropriate reactions.


Incorporating Twine Game Design Units in Different Settings
Mark Chen, Victoria Stay

This is a story about learning to create a navigable story using twinery.org with a group of adolescents in LosAngeles. Like any good story, it's a developing trilogy, involving four intersecting but unique groups with different traits and access to resources. Our journey developing curriculum and learning how best to create twines with each group has been nuanced and continues developing. Twine are lo-tech, choose your-own-adventure, digital narrative games. Integral to twines and this story are the many media that may be used to tell a story. Our adolescent were free to use written word, digital photos, photos taken of hand-drawn pictures, transcribed spoken word, flowcharts, or any combination therein. Where the goal of designing games and narrative is to give voice to the participants, Twine and multi-modal media for storytelling provide an especially empowering experience that may also help participants learn about systems, develop agency and enable learning.

Moderators
avatar for Deborah Fields

Deborah Fields

Independent Research Consultant & Temporary Assistant Professor of Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences, Utah State University
Dr. Deborah A. Fields is a Temporary Assistant Professor in Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University and an independent research consultant. Deborah researches children’s connective learning and identity engagement through designing with digital technologies in ways that bridge informal and formal learning contexts. She is the co-PI on the Kids' DIY Media Project (kidsdiymedia.com) aimed at identifying and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Mark Chen

Mark Chen

Accidental Hero and Layabout, Independent
non-tenure track positions. | life after a PhD. | gaming culture and power/agency in gaming practice. | esoteric gaming practices, workarounds, and hacks. | subversion, representation, margins. | board games.
avatar for David Ng

David Ng

Faculty, University of British Columbia
David Ng is a geneticist, science educator, and faculty based at the UBC Michael Smith Laboratories.  Of note: (1) he is partly responsible for the massive DNA helix emblazoned on his building’s facade; (2) his Dad beat up Bruce Lee; (3) his first foray into general publishing featured a unicorn on the front cover; and (4) his lab studies things like Pokemon and creativity. Learn more at bioteach.ubc.ca


Thursday July 9, 2015 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Class of '24

4:00pm

Building Opportunities for Faculty Adoption of Game-Based Learning Strategies in Higher Education
Building Opportunities for Faculty Adoption of Game-Based Learning Strategies in Higher Education
Megan Mathews, Les Finken, Lisa Kelly

For the past year, the ITS Office of Teaching, Learning & Technology has centrally supported innovative teaching and learning with a game-based learning (GBL) initiative. Our educational development opportunities yielded surprising and informative advantages and challenges for faculty adoption of GBL. Join us in this interactive session as we share our multifaceted approach to support faculty adoption of GBL in higher education.

Speakers
avatar for Megan Mathews

Megan Mathews

Learning Technology Programming Coordinator, The University of Iowa


Thursday July 9, 2015 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Beefeaters

5:00pm

Marquee Dinner
Thursday July 9, 2015 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Tripp Deck

7:00pm

GLS Showcase Ceremony
The GLS Showcase (formerly the Educational Game Arcade) is a chance to celebrate the best of educational games. Curated by Dennis Ramirez and co-chair Jason Mathias, the Showcase provides an opportunity for you to play games made by your colleagues. We will also hold an evening GLS Showcase Award Ceremony for the top five games on Thursday evening with special guest judges and master of ceremonies Dan Norton of Filament Games. This year's stage judges include Brenda & John Romero, Mark DeLoura, and Adam Mayes.

Moderators
avatar for Dennis Ramirez

Dennis Ramirez

Technical Director, USC IMGD, Videogame Researcher

Speakers
avatar for Mark DeLoura

Mark DeLoura

Former White House
Games for education, computer science literacy, White House adventures, game technology. Green tea.
AM

Adam Mayes

Subject Responsible for Game Design, Uppsala University
avatar for Brenda Romero

Brenda Romero

Brenda Romero is an award-winning game designer, Fulbright scholar, entrepreneur, artist, writer and creative director who entered the video game industry in 1981. Brenda has worked with a variety of digital game companies as a game designer, creative director or consultant, including Atari, Sir-tech Software, Electronic Arts and numerous companies in the social and mobile space. She is presently the Program Director of UC Santa Cruz’s... Read More →
avatar for John Romero

John Romero

John Romero is an award-winning game designer, programmer and artist whose work spans over 130 games, 107 of which have been published commercially, including the iconic works Wolfenstein 3D, DOOM and Quake. Romero has worked in the mobile, core, mid-core, casual, social and MMO space. | | Romero is a serial entrepreneur who has founded eight successful companies including companies in the traditional hardcore, MMO and mobile spaces. His... Read More →


Thursday July 9, 2015 7:00pm - 8:00pm
Great Hall

8:00pm

Filament Games Party
Join us at the new Filament Games offices downtown, just off the Capitol Square at 316 West Washington, 10th floor! We'll be kicking back and relaxing with food, wine, beer, and live music for an evening of game-related chat, networking, and general revelry. Gaming stations will be provided if you want to pick up the joysticks and go head-to-head with your GLS peers, or you can simply unwind and enjoy the view of Madison's stunning skyline. We hope to see you there!

Sponsors

Thursday July 9, 2015 8:00pm - 11:00pm
Filament Games 316 West Washington Avenue, Floor #10

8:00pm

Arcade
Thursday July 9, 2015 8:00pm - Friday July 10, 2015 12:00am
Tripp Commons
 
Friday, July 10
 

9:00am

Breakfast and Keynote
The Value of Games in Education
John Romero

Many agree that the future of education is digital – to move textbooks from the frontline as a teaching instrument and to bring connected devices to the fore. Many also agree that there’s no better way to keep kids’ attention than to give them a fun game to play. Combine games, connected devices, and education, and you have the future. In this talk, John Romero reveals the interesting and surprising six-year arc of an educational MMO turned iOS app and talks about this crucial intersection, ways to make it work, and provides examples of how it’s presently working.

Speakers
avatar for John Romero

John Romero

John Romero is an award-winning game designer, programmer and artist whose work spans over 130 games, 107 of which have been published commercially, including the iconic works Wolfenstein 3D, DOOM and Quake. Romero has worked in the mobile, core, mid-core, casual, social and MMO space. | | Romero is a serial entrepreneur who has founded eight successful companies including companies in the traditional hardcore, MMO and mobile spaces. His... Read More →


Friday July 10, 2015 9:00am - 10:00am
Great Hall

10:30am

Children & Code
Children & Code: The Need for Procedural Literacy
John Romero

John Romero is an award-winning game designer, programmer and artist whose work spans over 130 games, 107 of which have been published commercially, including the iconic works Wolfenstein 3D, DOOM and Quake. Romero has worked in the mobile, core, mid-core, casual, social and MMO space.

Romero is a serial entrepreneur who has founded eight successful companies including companies in the traditional hardcore, MMO and mobile spaces. His contributions and philanthropy within the commercial game industry have led to a myriad of inspired games and the founding of 10 companies. He is considered to be among the world’s top game designers, and his products have won every major award.

One of the earliest “indie” developers, Romero began working in the game space in 1979 on mainframes before moving to the Apple II in 1981. He is a completely self-taught programmer, designer and artist, having drawn his inspirations from early Apple II programmers.

Romero’s current areas of interest are Facebook games and massively multi-player online (MMO) games as well as social media and its intersection with gaming. Romero also remains active in the artgame, game history and indie spaces.

Speakers
avatar for John Romero

John Romero

John Romero is an award-winning game designer, programmer and artist whose work spans over 130 games, 107 of which have been published commercially, including the iconic works Wolfenstein 3D, DOOM and Quake. Romero has worked in the mobile, core, mid-core, casual, social and MMO space. | | Romero is a serial entrepreneur who has founded eight successful companies including companies in the traditional hardcore, MMO and mobile spaces. His... Read More →


Friday July 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Capitol View

10:30am

Log-data, Interviews, and Observation: What Can They Tell Us About Learning in a Museum-based Mobile Game
Log-data, Interviews, and Observation: What Can They Tell Us About Learning in a Museum-based Mobile Game
Jennifer Sly, David Gagnon, Nicolaas VanMeerten, Kate Haley-Goldman

Museum exhibits are often considered passive experiences that have trouble engaging younger students. To increase their appeal, museums have begun re-inventing themselves by creating interactive multimedia exhibits that are supplemented with mobile technology. The Minnesota Historical Society (MNHS) has embraced this movement by developing a student-guided field trip experience called Play the Past (PtP), which was developed to enhance collaboration, critical thinking, and understanding of history. The current panel will discuss the development of PtP and evaluation of learning through several methods including, observations, interviews, and logged behavioral data. Lastly, the impact of the findings on the design of the exhibit will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for David Gagnon

David Gagnon

Director, Field Day Lab, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I have a sweet spot for directing small design teams to approach big challenges. I like thinking and making real world products that are inspired by all the cool stuff kids like these days. I love seeing other people find themselves by making something new. I also am a bit of a baking addict, still trying to nail the traditional sour dough baguette in a wood fired oven.
KH

Kate Haley Goldman

Principal, Audience Viewpoints Consulting
JS

Jen Sly

Manager of Digital Learning & Assessment, Minnesota Historical Society
Jennifer Sly leads the new Digital Learning and Assessment group at the Minnesota Historical Society. Other projects she has led are the Play the Past and “Reinventing the Field Trip for the 21st Century” projects.  For the past 15 years, Jennifer has worked at the intersection of technology and education in informal learning environments.  Jennifer has a B.A. from St. Olaf College in Math and Music and an M.P.A. from the... Read More →
avatar for Nicolaas VanMeerten

Nicolaas VanMeerten

Data Scientist, GLITCH
Anything! :)


Friday July 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Main Lounge

10:30am

Leveling Up: Measuring and Leveraging Implicit STEM Learning in Games
Leveling Up: Measuring and Leveraging Implicit STEM learning in Games
Jodi Asbell-Clarke, Elizabeth Rowe, Erin Bardar, Michael Eagle, Rebecca Brown, Ryan Baker, Tiffany Barnes, Teon Edwards

Games provide an important vehicle for educators to promote and study learning. The data logs generated through digital gameplay can be mined to understand the patterns of play that may be related to implicit learning—the development of knowledge that is not yet explicitly formalized. Teachers can use examples from games to help bridge implicit game-based learning to explicit STEM concepts taught in class. This set of papers will describe how a series of STEM learning games, along with a variety of data mining and graph analytics, has been used as a vehicle by researchers and teachers to improve high school physics learning by measuring and leveraging implicit STEM learning.

Speakers
avatar for Jodi Asbell-Clarke

Jodi Asbell-Clarke

Director, TERC
I direct a team of game designers, researchers, and learning scientists who live and work on the edge of science and play.
avatar for Erin Bardar

Erin Bardar

Education Materials Director, EdGE at TERC
As Education Materials Director for EdGE at TERC, my role includes elements of game design, outreach, and curriculum development. I work with the design team to help ensure that beneath all the fun, the games we develop are grounded in science that is both accurate and aligned with high school standards. My work also includes collaborating with teachers to develop bridge activities that help students connect the content knowledge and skills... Read More →
avatar for Teon Edwards

Teon Edwards

Lead Designer, EdGE at TERC
Games for learning; | Play for learning; | Using the digital to engage people in the world around them; | Wait-time learning; | Tacit learning in STEM based games; | Zoombinis (Hip, hip, Zoombinis!!!)
avatar for Elizabeth Rowe

Elizabeth Rowe

Director of Research, EdGE @ TERC


Friday July 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Old Madison

10:30am

Playing at School: A Strategic Discussion on the Evolving Role of Game Mechanics in Curriculum & Assessment
Playing at School: A Strategic Discussion on the Evolving Role of Game Mechanics in Curriculum & Assessment
Stephen Slota, Trent Hergenrader, Sasha Barab, Jennifer Killham, Denise Bressler, Roger Travis, Remi Holden

In our (2012) Review of Educational Research meta-analysis, we (Young et al.) recommended that games and learning researchers consider how individual differences in player skills and goals adopted "in the moment" affect play and learning. Our primary concern was that averaging across the play experiences of many learners (e.g., a classroom full) may mask entirely game-based instruction's impact on individual student learning outcomes. As a next step, we seek to engage the GLS community in service of defining how: 1) game designers and researchers might take a more deeply situated view of thinking, play, and learning; 2) associated research methods can be shifted away from the traditional group comparison, mean difference view; and 3) games can be designed around goal adoption and fulfillment in playful spaces.

In this moderated panel session, GBL designers and researchers from across the country will strategically discuss issues of player goal emergence, complex player-game-environment interactions, and how games/game mechanics can and should be leveraged across education during the next decade. It is our hope that it will be a great first step toward finding our GBL princess in the right Koopa-guarded castle.


Speakers
avatar for Sasha Barab

Sasha Barab

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
My work involves the seamless integration of bounded games (where players can fail safely, receive embedded assessment, and have consequentiality in the confines of a fictional world) and larger, flexible 'meta-game' structures and affinity spaces that foster user-driven extensions and adaptations in support of real-world goals ad outcomes.
avatar for Remi Holden

Remi Holden

GLS Playful Learning Summit Co-Chair, University of Colorado Denver
avatar for Stephen Slota

Stephen Slota

Co-Founder, The Pericles Group, LLC
Steve (@steveslota) is an instructional design specialist and game design scientist at the University of Connecticut Health Center and a co-founder of The Pericles Group, LLC. He holds a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology: Cognition, Instruction, & Learning Technologies and has worked on a variety of game and instructional design projects with organizations including Arizona State University's Center for Games & Impact, Intel Corporation, and... Read More →
avatar for Roger Travis

Roger Travis

Storrs, CT, US, University of Connecticut, and The Pericles Group, LLC
Only connect: ancient epic to video games; teacher to student; gamer to gamer; fan to fan; parent to child; human being to human being.


Friday July 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Inn Wisconsin

10:30am

Where the Rubber Meets the (Cross)Road: Insights into Game-Based Learning & Assessment Design
Where the Rubber Meets the (Cross)Road: Insights into Game-Based Learning & Assessment Design
V. Elizabeth Owen, Kristen E. DiCerbo, Michelle M. Riconscente, Elizabeth Kline, Erin Hoffman, G. Tanner Jackson, Maria Bertling

Human agency—the power to shape a course of action (Bandura, 2006)—has long been held central to empowered, self-regulated learning (Pintrich, 1999). Implicit in this choice-centered learning is the ability to take different pathways towards a solution, a key affordance of games as a medium to deliver engaging, effective educational experiences (c.f. Salen & Zimmerman, 2004). The work in this symposium reflects a holistic design goal in game-based learning—integrated learning and assessment which can support multiple pathways to learning. This integrated design is discussed from four perspectives: teacher-facing UI design, learning game design (integrated instruction & assessment), psychometric assessment analysis, and exploratory data mining of unexpected learner patterns.

Speakers
avatar for Kristen DiCerbo

Kristen DiCerbo

Vice President of Education Research, Pearson
Kristen is the Vice-President of Education Research at Pearson, working to integrate learning science research into digital products. Her personal research program centers around game-based assessment, specifically the collaborative design of games as both learning and assessment tools and the use of statistical models to turn data into evidence of student knowledge, skills, and attributes. She has worked on a computer networking game at Cisco... Read More →
avatar for G. Tanner Jackson

G. Tanner Jackson

Educational Testing Service
avatar for Elizabeth Owen

Elizabeth Owen

Director, Learning & Data Science, Age of Learning
Elizabeth Owen holds a PhD in Digital Media (School of Education) from UW-Madison, focused on game-based learning analytics. Currently the Director of Learning and Data Science at Age of Learning, she's committed to optimizing adaptive learning systems through applied machine learning. Previously a researcher and data scientist with GlassLab Games (EA campus), LRNG, and Metacog, her doctoral work is rooted at the Games+Learning+Society Center... Read More →


Friday July 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Class of '24

10:30am

Intergenerational Gaming in Kerbal Space Program
Intergenerational Gaming in Kerbal Space Program
Eric Klopfer, Oren Klopfer

Kerbal Space Program is a detailed, challenging and engaging simulation game about to exit Beta into final release. The fidelity of the simulation and range of choices make the game interesting and represent a departure from many modern simulation games. Other elements of design, including the iterative, turn-based play, and required knowledge make it amenable to intergenerational play. This Well Played session by a parent and child duo walks through the game play itself and some of the interesting parent-child/child-parent interactions promoted by game play.

Speakers
OK

Oren Klopfer

McCall Middle School


Friday July 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Play Circle Theater

10:30am

Designing Your Own Online Learning World
Designing Your Own Online Learning World
Brendon Trombley

Online Minecraft communities are as diverse as they are numerous, ranging from “vanilla” style all the way to competitive “Hunger Games” arenas. Each community exists on a specialized server utilizing a combination of world design and third-party add-ons to create unique experiences. It’s an emerging kind of game design requiring little technical skill, only a bit of creativity. This workshop takes participants through the beginning phases of designing a new Minecraft server around a learning outcome. They will visualize the design of their worlds, planning out the use of space and points of interest. They will also research and choose add-ons to introduce mechanics and rules that promote specific player experiences. In the end, participants will leave with designs for new Minecraft communities plus resources and next steps for implementation. This workshop is best suited for participants with some level of previous familiarity with Minecraft.

Speakers
avatar for Brendon Trombley

Brendon Trombley

Game Designer, Institute of Play
Brendon Trombley is a game designer, educator, and adventurer living in New York City. His passions involve games, technology, learning, travel, and food, and he tries to mix and match them whenever possible (be careful when combining food and technology!). | | Brendon is a graduate of the New Media Design program at Rochester Institute of Technology, where he trained in the principles of design in addition to a wide array of... Read More →


Friday July 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Beefeaters

11:30am

Coffee Break & Snack
Friday July 10, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Great Hall

12:00pm

Gaming and the Future of Families
Gaming and the Future of Families
Elisabeth Gee

Speakers
avatar for Elisabeth Gee

Elisabeth Gee

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
I'm the Associate Director of the Center for Games & Impact at ASU, and co-directing the Play2Connect initiative with Dr. Sinem Siyahhan at Cal State-San Marcos. I'm interested in gender and gaming, game-based affinity spaces, and intergenerational play.


Friday July 10, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Capitol View

12:00pm

Include Me; Exclude Me: Diversity, Learning, and Games Post-#GamerGate
Include Me; Exclude Me: Diversity, Learning, and Games Post-#GamerGate
Cody Reimer, Alex Layne, Samantha Blackmon

This panel discusses the ways exclusivity, a lack of diversity, and ethical problems impact the world of games and education, including our conceptions of play. Panelists discuss theorycrafting, League of Legends, #GamerGate, Game Studies Curriculum, and Posthuman theory in an attempt to examine both how we as scholars and educations set the tone for the future of Game Studies and how to encourage the themes of diversity, ethics, and inclusivity as central components of what it means to study games.

Speakers
avatar for Samantha Blackmon

Samantha Blackmon

Associate Professor, Purdue University
Games and Literacy Education
AL

Alex Layne

St. Paul, Minnesota, United States, Metropolitan State University


Friday July 10, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Main Lounge

12:00pm

Critical Thinking Skills
13 Fallacies: A Card Game to Promote Critical Thinking in At-Risk College Students
Julia Gressick, Joel Langston

Fostering undergraduates’ critical thinking is a ubiquitous goal across disciplines (e.g. Gellin, 2003). How best to support the development of these skills has been a topic of debate. In this study, we investigated the design and effectiveness of a card-based game focused on student understanding of common fallacies. 13 Fallacies is designed with the intention to improve the quality of student reasoning by engaging them in exploration of common fallacies in thinking and associated social negotiation. There is strong theoretical support for 13 Fallacies to yield positive learning outcomes. Using a design-based research approach, we have completed an iterative design phase, play testing phase and have collected data on student learning outcomes as a result of classroom implementation of 13 Fallacies. Results indicate that 13 Fallacies improved student understanding of common fallacies in thinking.


Sick Kitty - Toward Promoting Deductive Reasoning through an Embodied Medical Diagnosis Game
Rachel Harsley, Nick Green, Mehrdad Alizadeh, Aashish Tandon, Anushri Prabhu

In this paper, we introduce Sick Kitty, a multimodal deductive logic game for primary school children. Sick Kitty situates students as experts with the task of disease diagnosis. They are equipped with a mix of simulated medical tools and a lively stuffed kitty as patient. Sick Kitty is an untraditional method to teach reasoning in classrooms. The main contribution of this work is the design of the multi-modal logic game that promotes scientific reasoning and inquiry. We expect that Sick Kitty will promote the development of deductive reasoning ability for students.


A New Model for Producing and Deploying Learning Games
Justin Leites

A new publisher of educational games uses an innovative model for producing and deploying a large number of ambitious learning games for grades 4-9. The model produces games suitable for outside-the-classroom use, with a focus on how best to achieve high levels of voluntary engagement. Key features of the model include a studio system inspired by practices from art galleries and Montessori pedagogy; agile/iterative development; students participating as active participants in the design process; extensive use of “explore, build and share” game mechanics; virtual worlds tying together dozens of games from different designers; and extensive integration of a large virtual library as part of one of those worlds. Early feedback is promising, including higher than expected levels of teacher and parent engagement. Many schools are initially anxious about students sharing user-generated content with each other, and seek best practices for deploying games that enable such sharing.


Friday July 10, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Inn Wisconsin

12:00pm

Gamification That Isn't Bullshit
A Playful Class: Case-study Analysis of Gamified Course Design
Seann Dikkers, Amira Alkhawajah, Chris Hawks

Recently researchers of ‘gamified’, or ‘badgified’, classrooms are documenting promising increases in motivation and engagement using vocabulary swapping (Leach et. al, 2014), leaderboards (DeShutter & Abeele, 2014), and formative recognition strategies (Augilar, Homan & Fishman, 2013), yet these efforts retain core pedagogical designs of the traditional classroom. Gaming media leverages elements still foreign to classrooms settings; like ‘questing’, ‘adjusting play-style’, ‘voluntary competition’, ‘repeatable content’, ’strategy guides’, and ‘cheats’. How much more can engagement be amplified by embedding these features as pedagogical changes to traditional course designs? We present qualitative design-based research and supporting evidence from one course iteration. Participants reported increased motivation and engagement supported by time on task data, ‘help desk’ data, and an increase in average task completion to 66.2 per student. We conclude game-like elements further increase student motivation, engagement, and a striking investment of time.


Teaching as Designing: Creating Game-Inspired Classes
Jeffrey Holmes, Adam Ingram-Goble

Good teaching is a form of design. Yet, while there has been a significant increase in game-based learning approaches over the last decade, little work has been done to bridge the good pedagogical principles of games with a robust theory of teaching and course design. This paper describes the implementation of two “game-inspired” undergraduate courses which leveraged the conceptual and organizational principles of games to structure each course. While both courses established student roles aligned to content goals, one course emphasized collaboration structures and specialization, while the other iterated roles in the service of supporting a broader dispositional development. We argue that course design is one way of meaningfully orienting learners’ engagement with the course content and their own participation.

Moderators
avatar for Dennis Ramirez

Dennis Ramirez

Technical Director, USC IMGD, Videogame Researcher

Speakers
avatar for Seann Dikkers

Seann Dikkers

Education Department Chair, Bethel University
Seann Dikkers is an associate professor of Education at Bethel University. Formerly, Seann served fourteen years as a middle school teacher, high school principal, and researcher. Now he teaches, writes, and works with some amazing colleagues at Bethel. He studies exemplary teaching, learning design, and learning systems. His books include *Real-Time Research*, *Mobile Media Learning I and II*, and *TeacherCraft: Minecraft in the Classroom... Read More →
avatar for Scott Nicholson

Scott Nicholson

Associate Professor, Syracuse University School of Information Studies
Dr. Scott Nicholson is an Associate Professor at Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies and the Director of the Because Play Matters game lab. His areas of interest include meaningful gamification and the creation of transformative games for informal learning and training through participatory design. Dr. Nicholson is a published board game designer, wrote the book Everyone Plays at the Library, and was the host of the Web video... Read More →


Friday July 10, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Old Madison

12:00pm

Finding the Beat: Cycles of Expertise in Rhythm Games
Finding the Beat: Cycles of Expertise in Rhythm Games
Kevin Miklasz

I have experienced an interesting puzzle when playing rhythm games: gameplay on a song usually proceeds from being so complex that I don’t even know what I’m doing wrong, to being so fluent that I can play the song without conscious effort. Thus, I get better at the game without knowing how that improvement occurs or what it looks like. To better understand the development of my own rhythm game literacy, I downloaded four songs on the popular rhythm game Jukebeat, and recorded all of my gameplay on those four songs over a period of nine months. From this analysis I can determine how much and how quickly I am improving my performance, and whether that improvement is due to increased visual, audio or tactile skills. Along with this empirical data, I also present a theoretical framework for understanding the development of rhythm game literacy.

Speakers
avatar for Kevin Miklasz

Kevin Miklasz

Assessment Specialist, BrainPOP
I work on the design of new playful assessments on BrainPOP's website, and the analysis of the clickstream data that results from such assessments. I describe myself as a gamer, foodie, scientists and educator in no particular order. I love teaching kids using games and game design, I like creating games myself and I like analyzing them.


Friday July 10, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Play Circle Theater

12:00pm

Games in Art, History, & Humanities
Secret Societies of the Avant-garde
Keri Watson, Anastasia Salter

Our design of "Secret Societies of the Avant-garde" (under testing Spring 2015 in a mixed mode course on Twentieth-Century Art) will demonstrate how using a serious game to teach art history not only fosters interactive learning, but models one of the most compelling artistic trends of the post/modern era as well. These models, the mechanics of the adventure game genre (puzzle-driven and informed by a sense of participating in a goal-driven narrative thread), and our knowledge of modern art inform the game’s design. The game has five phases, during which students will play in teams and uncover and interpret artifacts from various art historical movements of the twentieth century. Working together, they will interpret primary and secondary sources including visual objects, letters, and essays, craft cohesive narratives for their objects that situate them within an avant-garde movement, and compete for clues that will help their team overcome obstacles.


Steampunk Rochester
Trent Hergenrader, Steve Jacobs

Steampunk Rochester,” is an interdisciplinary project at the Rochester Institute of Technology that involves approximately 75 students from three colleges (Lib Arts, Comp Sci, and Imaging Arts) and four departments (English, Fine Arts, Interactive Games and Media, and 3D Digital Design) that takes place over an academic year. Students are recreating the world of Rochester in the 1920s, first in text and then in one or more video games and accounting for social forces at play that time, including labor struggles, women’s suffrage, racism against immigrants, prohibition, and wealth stratification. Students are also learning that local history can be a rich foundation for the creation of game worlds.


Working Example: Using Popular Games for Serious Learning
Scot Osterweil, Eric Klopfer, Carole Urbano, Philip Tan, Rik Eberhardt, Jesse Sell, Kyrie Eleison H. Caldwell

A team of MIT researchers, in close collaboration with high school humanities teachers, is designing and testing supplemental curriculum resources for using games to support learning in the classroom. This is a work-in-progress in between the Seed and Sprout phases.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Kyrie Eleison H. Caldwell

Kyrie Eleison H. Caldwell

Graduate Student (Master's), Massachusetts Institute of Technology
I am a master's candidate in Comparative Media Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where I work in the MIT Game Lab and The Education Arcade. My current research interests lie in intersectional representation, gender, and affect in games, and my background is in art history and religious studies.
RE

Richard Eberhardt

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
avatar for Stephen Jacobs

Stephen Jacobs

Associate Director, RIT Center for Media, Art Games Interaction and Creativity
Stephen Jacobs is an Associate Director of the Center for Media, Art, Games, Interaction and Creativity (MAGIC) and a Professor in the School of Interactive Games and Media at RIT. He has been a game and/or narrative designer on the serious game efforts Just Press Play, Picture the Impossible, MindGamers, Flip for History, and consulted on game design and narrative for Second Avenue Learning, and Ratatoskr Entertainment,Inc and others. He... Read More →
avatar for Scot Osterweil

Scot Osterweil

Scot Osterweil is Creative Director of the Education Arcade in the MIT Comparative Media Studies Program. He has designed award-winning games in both academic and commercial environments, focusing on what is authentically playful in challenging academic subjects. Designs include the acclaimed Zoombinis series (math and logic), Vanished: The MIT/Smithsonian Curated Game(environmental science), Labyrinth (math), Kids Survey Network (data and... Read More →
avatar for Anastasia Salter

Anastasia Salter

Assistant Professor, University of Central Florida
Anastasia Salter is an assistant professor in digital media and texts & technology at the University of Central Florida. She is the author of What is Your Quest? From Adventure Games to Interactive Books (University of Iowa Press, 2014) and co-author of Flash: Building the Interactive Web (MIT Press, 2014). She writes for ProfHacker, a blog on technology and pedagogy hosted by the Chronicle of Higher Education.
avatar for Keri Watson

Keri Watson

Assistant Professor of Art History, University of Central Florida
Keri Watson is an assistant professor of art history at the University of Central Florida and specializes in modern and contemporary art and the history of photography. She has published on topics including Patricia Cronin’s public sculpture, Eudora Welty’s photography, and Judy Chicago’s feminist pedagogy, as well as curated exhibitions on sideshow banners and photographs, the photography of the civil rights movement, the history of... Read More →


Friday July 10, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Class of '24

12:00pm

Interactive Life Sized 3D Digital Modeling & Simulation: A Case Study in Anatomy and Physiology Education
Interactive Life Sized 3D Digital Modeling & Simulation: A Case Study in Anatomy and Physiology Education
Eric Bauman, Charles Hutchison, Reid Adams, Carmen Fuentealba, David Pederson, Greg Gilbert, Brian Pelletier, Greg Vaughan, Kurt Squire

3D digital simulation and related educational technology represent a relatively new phenomenon in clinical and STEM education. When such technology is leveraged to prepare students for clinical and science related encounters, it should map back to the curriculum and strive to solve challenges associated with traditional didactic instructional techniques (Bauman & Ralston-Berg, 2014). The AnatomyTable provides an interactive large format 3D touchscreen experience to reinforce anatomy and physiology objectives for veterinary medicine students. This workshop will provide a hands on interactive experience for attendees followed by a presenter facilitated discussion about how this type of technology might be used to engage students throughout the health sciences and STEM curricula.

Speakers
avatar for Reid Adams

Reid Adams

Director of Simulation Ops., DeVry Medical International's Institute for Research and Clinical Strategy
Reid Adams is Associate Director for the DeVry, Inc. Center for Excellence in Simulation Education and The Simulation Operations Specialist at the St. Joseph Mercy Oakland – Clinical Simulation Education Research Center. He has worked extensively in simulation with multiple healthcare disciplines at various levels of training, ranging from under graduate to practicing clinician. Reid’s previously work at the Ross University School of Medicine... Read More →
avatar for Eric Bauman

Eric Bauman

Asst. Dean for Educational Technology and Game-Based Learning, DeVry Medical International Inst. for Research & Clinical Strategy
Dr. Eric B. Bauman received his PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Education, Department of Curriculum and Instruction in 2007. Eric was one of the early Games+Learning+Society (GLS) students and was advised by Professors Betty Hayes and Kurt Squire, both renowned scholars in the game-based learning movement. Dr. Bauman is also a registered nurse, firefighter and paramedic with more than 20 years of clinical, research... Read More →
avatar for Brian Pelletier

Brian Pelletier

Creative Director & Head of Development, Games Learning Society Center & Learning Games Network
I'm a professional artist and appreciate the comic book art form for storytelling. I have been developing video games for 21 years. I love creating story through art and games provided me the opportunity to bring artwork to life in an interactive story. After developing and shipping 16 AAA retail games that my kids could not play I became passionate about creating games for them that would be fun and meaningful. I'm able to follow that passion... Read More →
avatar for Greg Vaughan

Greg Vaughan

Lead Software Engineer, Learning Games Network


Friday July 10, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Beefeaters

1:00pm

Lunch and Speed Runs
Speed Runs are the GLS version of Ignite talks. This year’s speed run’s session will feature invited talks from top folks in the games and learning field, curated by Sean Duncan. Come prepared for fast-paced, brilliant, and provocative ideas!

We're excited to announce that this year's Speed Run speakers are Matthew Berland, Elisabeth Gee, Linsday Grace, Adam Mayes, Andrew Phelps, and Squinky.

Moderators
avatar for Sean Duncan

Sean Duncan

Assistant Professor, Indiana University

Speakers
MB

Matthew Berland

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
avatar for Elisabeth Gee

Elisabeth Gee

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
I'm the Associate Director of the Center for Games & Impact at ASU, and co-directing the Play2Connect initiative with Dr. Sinem Siyahhan at Cal State-San Marcos. I'm interested in gender and gaming, game-based affinity spaces, and intergenerational play.
avatar for Lindsay Grace

Lindsay Grace

Director and Associate Professor, American University Game Lab
Lindsay Grace is a professor, game designer, programmer, and artist. Lindsay is an associate professor at American University and founding director of the American University Game Lab and Studio. His game designs have received numerous awards and he has published more than 50 papers, articles, and book chapters on games. His creative work has been showcased in more than eight countries and 12 U.S. states, including New York, Paris, Rio De... Read More →
AM

Adam Mayes

Subject Responsible for Game Design, Uppsala University


Friday July 10, 2015 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Great Hall

2:00pm

2:30pm

Beer & Brats on the Terrace
Friday July 10, 2015 2:30pm - 7:00pm
Terrace

3:00pm

Zoombinis Launch Party!
Join us on the afternoon of Friday, July 10 for a a launch party celebrating the return of Zoombinis! Want to learn more about the game? Check out their Kickstarter page for more info.

Friday July 10, 2015 3:00pm - 5:00pm
Tripp Commons

5:00pm

Crooked County Performance
Each year, the GLS Conference concludes on the beautiful Union Terrace overlooking the shores of Lake Mendota. It’s an afternoon and evening for ice cream, brats, and beer. This year will be extra special because the last day of the conference is Professor Kurt Squire’s birthday, and he and his band Crooked County take to the stage to play.

Crooked County‘s lineup is unusual, but it’s one that works for the band’s outlaw, rough-and-ready style. Rather than having just one drummer within its ranks, the group’s hard-driving sound is backed by a pair of them, and lead vocals are contributed by three members. Toby Purnell and Kurt Squire co-founded Crooked County in 1998 in Bloomington, IN. Purnell can be found on vocals, mandolin, and electric guitar, while Squire plays harmonica. The pair met earlier in the decade when they both played with the Indiana bands Big Mule, Preacher Preacher, and the Mary Janes. Drawing inspiration from Bill Monroe‘s bluegrass music and Willie Nelson’s country sound, they decided to strike out on their own as Crooked County. The band also includes Jason Purnell, Toby Purnell’s brother, on acoustic guitar. Merrie Sloan contributes vocals, bass, and guitar, while Josh Bennett adds vocals and bass. The dual drummers are Travis Olsson and Mark Minnick. Shortly after establishing Crooked County, Squire and Toby Purnell began working on Whiskey Burns, the group’s 1999 self-released debut. The album featured Jeff Farias on bass. Soon the band added Bennett, Jason Purnell, and Minnick for live gigs throughout the Midwest and Southwest. Farias moved on, settling in Phoenix, AZ, and eventually asking Crooked County to record for his company, Rustic Records. The label issued the band’s second release, Drunkard’s Lament. Like Toby Purnell and Squire, drummer Minnick also spent time in the Mary Janes. Toby Purnell also played previously with a group known as Ma and Pa Kegle, where he first met Sloan. Drummer Olsson devotes time to a punk group named the Opposition.

Check out their music on SoundCloud.


Friday July 10, 2015 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Terrace